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I was wonder who this woman was. It isn't Nefertiti, so I was wondering if this was Isis or Cleopatra or perhaps anyone else, I'm unsure.

The symbol on her head is a snake and she's just holding a decoration lamp.

I added a picture of the inscription too (Click image to enlarge)

IMG: IMG:

EDIT: For people who misunderstand: I know it's not authentic nor am I asking if it is or not. I just want to know who the woman is.

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    Is she a specific Egyptian woman? Is this an artifact or a random object for sale? Does it have provenance? – Mark C. Wallace May 24 '16 at 19:23
  • @MarkC.Wallace it should represent a specific Egyptian woman. It's not a holy artifact or something like that, just a lamp :) – Decypher May 24 '16 at 19:26
  • I don't see a cartouche in the inscription, which I would looked for if it were a depiction of some royal personage. There's a number of apps (and you can also google) for hieroglyphs, if you really want to dig in.Then a good dictionary for ancient Egyptian and you're good! (and halfway to a degree in Egyptology ;) ) – Marakai May 24 '16 at 23:50
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    If it is a recently produced item, then it likely is not anyone specific... – user13123 May 25 '16 at 3:21
  • @Marakai I will :) I just started studying about 5 days ago haha. But going to look through those apps – Decypher May 25 '16 at 6:18
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The snake isn't just a snake, it's a defensive cobra known as Uraeus, and the woman depicted by this statue is may be Wadjet, an Egyptian goddess, whose symbol Uraeus primarily was. According to some newer mythologies, it was Isis who created the first Uraeus.

The Uraeus could have been added on the mask of important mortals as well, so Tutankhamun had one on his mask, too. So there's some chance that it could have been any important enough woman in the ancient Egyptian history. The inscription probably makes it clear who the woman is supposed to be.

The body is clearly a modern attractive woman – no woman on the old Egyptian statues was in such a good physical condition and so realistic – so the piece isn't supposed to be a replica of any ancient Egyptian sculpture.

  • thx for making it clear :) – Decypher May 25 '16 at 8:09

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