2

I'm mainly interested in the late Elizabethan and Jacobean periods. I've read church publications such as Church Society and AnglicansOnline,as well as all kinds of history websites and blogs, but I cant' find much information regarding my question. I mean they kept track of the number of recusants so why wouldn't they count the number of non-conformist ministers, at least on a diocesan level?

Here is my working definition of "Puritan":

Anyone found guilty of not wearing the required vestments (surplice and tippet, or in a cathedral a cope) or of not using all the prayers, rites, and ceremonies in the Book of Common Prayer.

  • 2
    What have you read so far? – WS2 Jan 28 '17 at 21:05
  • 1
    Please add your research to your question. (comments get deleted; questions that show preliminary research are less likely to get closed.) Is it possible that the question has no answer because there was no empirical test for membership in the Puritan cohort? – Mark C. Wallace Jan 28 '17 at 23:21
  • 1
    @TheHonRose Yes, just like modern 'evangelicals'. The term has a meaning but who is and isn't an evangelical may be debatable. – WS2 Jan 30 '17 at 1:14
  • 1
    @TheHonRose Here is my working definition of "Puritan": anyone found guilty of not wearing the required vestments (surplice and tippet, or in a cathedral a cope) or of not using all the prayers, rites, and ceremonies in the book of common prayer. – Harry Anderson Jan 30 '17 at 3:21
  • 1
    Harry, I added your working definition to your question. – KorvinStarmast Jan 31 '17 at 21:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.