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Masaccio, the Italian Renaissance master, has a painting called the Holy Trinity. In the bottom part of the painting, is a cadaver tomb, with an inscription. I have been able to find plenty of sources translating the inscription, but no source anywhere mentions what language the inscription is in. I'm assuming latin, but it could just as likely be Italian as well. Can anyone tell me what language the inscription is in?

Here's a link that describes the painting and the inscription: Holy Trinity Fresco by Masaccio (Wikipedia).

Here's the inscription:
IO FU[I] G[I]A QUEL CHE VOI S[I]ETE E QUEL CH['] I[O] SONO VO[I] A[N]C[OR] SARETE

Apparently, this inscription translates to:
I once was what you are and what I am you also will be

BONUS POINTS:
Why are there square brackets around certain letters when people write out the inscription?

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    It is Italian (Since it was written by a Florentine in the Renaissance, it is perhaps more accurate to say that it is in the Tuscan dialect Modern Italian is based on). The inscription is abreviated, as was usual in monumental inscriptions since at least Roman times, and the letters between brackets are the ones missing. – JMVanPelt Feb 8 '17 at 15:39
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    @JMVanPelt Please make this an answer rather than a comment. It appears that you know the answer. – KorvinStarmast Feb 8 '17 at 16:29
  • @JMVanPelt nice! Can you post your comment as an answer so I can mark it correct? – Tyler Jones Feb 8 '17 at 17:19
  • Old tombstones in the USA sometimes have a similar inscription in English: "As you are now, so was I once, as I am now, so shall you be." So apparently such inscriptions are a long tradition – MAGolding Feb 11 '17 at 21:24
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The inscription is in Italian or, perhaps more accurately, in the Tuscan dialect that became the basis of modern Italian. The inscription is written in an abbreviated form, which was usual in monumental inscriptions since at least Roman times and common in manuscripts and early printed books too — the missing letters are replaced, between brackets, when transcribing the text.

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