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What was the opinion of Hitler regarding pornography?

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    What does your preliminary research indicate? How can we help to clarify it? – AllInOne Feb 14 '17 at 19:35
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    Why are you asking this question? Do you have any reason to suppose that he should have had an opinion on this subject? Any reason to suppose that his opinion should be of historical significance? As it reads, this is not so different to asking what his favourite foods were, or whether he liked reading. – Shimon bM Feb 15 '17 at 0:43
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    A documentary I once saw about the "Entartente Kunst" exhibition of 1937 had a section about how idealized Aryan nudes had become a significant portion of Nazi art. – Spencer Feb 15 '17 at 1:07
  • Nudes in art generally aren't pornography. – Gort the Robot Feb 15 '17 at 6:17
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    Check BBC history magazine. They did an article on nudity in Nazi Germany. The government approved of it – Mark C. Wallace Jun 11 '17 at 10:45
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A little research reveals that Nazi party policy on sexuality was somewhat contradictory. This is not surprising, the same thing happened in many fields. Hitler's views were presumably similar to those of the party that followed him.

The core of Nazi policy was the idea of "race" and its fundamental importance to everything. An individual's own body was not their own to do with as they wished, but belonged to the German race. Nichole Loroff's article on Gender and Sexuality in Nazi Germany seems reasonably thorough.

Like most authoritarian groups, the Nazis espoused social conservatism, and wanted people to stay in very traditional gender roles, with men dominating society. Motherhood was viewed as the most important activity for women, serving the race in an equivalence of the way men served it as soldiers. However, they didn't try to hide and deny sexuality, but to turn it to their ends in increasing the population.

So "artistic" female nudity was a major aspect of Nazi art, while unapproved art with sexual elements was automatically pornography and "degenerate art." Unmarried German girls were encouraged to have sex with men, which caused large numbers of pregnancies - seen as a good thing - and spread venereal diseases - covered up, or blamed on the women.

Overall, the policy was an incoherent mixture of social traditionalism and satisfying the desires of men at the expense of women. Katherine Burdekin's novel Swastika Night dealt with it rather effectively in 1937.

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In "Mein Kampf," Hitler railed that

"The black-haired Jewish youth lies in wait for hours on end, satanically glaring at and spying on the unsuspicious girl whom he plans to seduce, adulterating her blood and removing her from the bosom of her own people. The Jew uses every possible means to undermine the racial foundations of a subjugated people." (Book 1 Chap 11)

Thinking as he did, Hitler probably believed that pornography was an instrument for leading German people, particularly women, "astray" (verfuhren).

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    Isn't this a bit too speculative? – Felix Goldberg Jun 11 '17 at 4:34
  • @FelixGoldberg: Hitler was also very aware of the value of propaganda and the media. If he believed that something was inherently "bad," he also believed that anything used to "propagate" it would also be bad. – Tom Au Jun 11 '17 at 4:36
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    Nevertheless, this is speculation. – Felix Goldberg Jun 12 '17 at 7:39

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