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I was visiting the historic city of Nicaea (Iznik) in Turkey this August and studied it's history. I noticed the entrance gate at the southern wall of the city which was built by the Romans.
The same entrance gate was used by the Ottoman sultan Orhan 1 (Orhan Gazi) when he entered the city after a long siege in 1331ad. The lower part of the gate has paintings of the sultan and his army celebrating the historic victory and event. The photos are attached.Iznik southern gate more southern gate more Iznik gate

There is a Greek inscription in large type at the top. Could someone who knows Greek translate this for me?

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    This building according to this is a electrical substation. The text is a bit unclear to me. Nicaea is misspelt as "Νεικαια" when it should be "Νικαια". The rest of the text appears to be taken from coin inscriptions. A standard long dedication reads roughly as "dedicated to the empire's ancient city of Nicaea by Magistrate and Proconsul Markos Plankios". This may not be fully correct so leaving as comment – Notaras Sep 22 '17 at 1:30
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This is only a partial answer, mainly to guide further answers and to lift the comment from @Notaras:

This building according to this is a electrical substation. The text is a bit unclear to me. Nicaea is misspelt as "Νεικαια" when it should be "Νικαια". The rest of the text appears to be taken from coin inscriptions. A standard long dedication reads roughly as "dedicated to the empire's ancient city of Nicaea by Magistrate and Proconsul Markos Plankios". This may not be fully correct so leaving as comment…

This is an electrical substation, or transformer building, disguised as something old:

enter image description here

It's a little hard to understand this is a transformer building. In the hands of a master painter who kept kept history… (machine translation from Turkish)

Although in most pictures of it on the net, those indicators of modern origin are often kept out of perspective…

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here Last two via İznik; Tiles and Tranquility

And it is said to depict Orhan entering the city through the nearby southern gate. The southern gate he used looks like this:

enter image description here Via The Walls of Nicea – the gates

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