Much of contemporary Western historiography and historical analysis is dominated by either the Post-Modern or Marxist approaches. Of course, Karl Marx was deeply influenced by George Hegel, however, Hegelian Dialectics is still an independently original school of historical thought and analysis. Can Hegelian-(NON-Marxist) dialectics regain its influence within contemporary historical discourse or has such a school of a thought gone the way of the dinosaurs?

Will Hegelian/Diaectical Historiography be revitalized in the near future? In other words, are there any signs within the recent historical literature or curricula which indicate a Hegelian renaissance? From my what I have seen and currently see, it does not appear to be the case. Perhaps you disagree and can provide me with some evidence which does indicate that there is a Hegelian or dialectical renaissance?

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    Can you please name one specific example of what you have in mind? E. g. a Hegelian non-Marxist historian? – Felix Goldberg Oct 12 '17 at 7:38
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    Questions about the future are usually matters of opinion. Maybe you want to know whether any historians are following the Hegelian model today? – Aaron Brick Oct 12 '17 at 16:27
  • I’m a little surprised no one has mentioned Francis Fukuyama. There are no “pure” Hegelians that I’m aware of, but Hegel’s ideas often hover implicitly behind progress narratives, and many of the questions he raised (or gave recognizably modern form to) remain live ones. – Era Sep 10 at 0:03

Hegel still has a great deal of influence in the sub-disciplines of the "History of Ideas." However, Hegels grand theory of History as a philosophical concept has almost no use in contemporary work and the dominant anglophone historically methods. The philosophical concept of "history" doesn't resemble the disciplinary practice of historians. Gyorgy Lukacs is as far from EP Thompson as Hegel is from the history of ideas.

One issue to consider though is the triumphalism present in anglophone "Whig" historians of either the Tory or Whiggish political perspective: America fuck yeah, with your choice of whom "America" is.

There are signs of interest in what is referred to in philosophy as the Hegelian Dialectic. Interestingly, for individuals who had not read Hegel previously, some cite the late hip-hip artist Prodigy of Mobb Deep as the individual which lead them to even be aware of the Hegelian Dialectic, see What is the Hegelian Dialectic?

Phaedon Lomis 1 year ago

Prodigy (Mobb Deep) brought me here

as they titled their last album The Hegelian Dialectic which includes songs directly addressing the political application of the dialectic, including Tyranny, No Religion, and Make America Great Again: Mafuckin U$A et al., and described how they interpreted the Hegelian Dialectic, see Hegelian Dialectic Explained With Prodigy Of Mobb Deep.

What is also interesting is the varied ways that people describe Hegel's Dialectics.

Specifically relating to Prodigy of Mobb Deep, given that they have an international fan base used to them including lyrics in their work that is particularly thought provoking, e.g., from the 1995 remix of L.L. Cool J's I Shot Ya

Illuminati want my mind, soul, and my body

Secret society, trying to keep they eye on me

But I'm stay incogni', in places they can't find me

see What's Behind Hip Hop's Illuminati Music Obsession?.

It is perhaps beyond the scope of this question to demonstrate the international influence that Prodigy of Mobb Deep has. Suffice to say that his decision to title his last album The Hegelian Dialectic has and will have a direct impact on the number of people (e.g., Prodigy Hegelian dialectic album and how it's philosophy controls America) who become aware of and study both Hegel and his dialectic.

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    A Prodigy album as your one and only example of "contemporary historical discourse" is a bit on the weak side. Such discourse is usually done by historians, not hip hop aficionados – DevSolar Sep 27 at 10:44
  • I would prefer you not getting personal about it, or judging my "capacity to understand". An artist's lyrics are, at best, a sidenote in "contemporary historical discourse". He might have brought people into contact with Hegel, but I don't think he'll be cited, or invited to any historian convention for his efforts. – DevSolar Sep 27 at 14:43
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    Neither the OP nor myself said anything about historical discourse being limited to "western academic notions". Science, by definition, knows no boundaries. That's why scientists of all fields communicate with each other, via papers, at conventions, and online as well. However, I get the impression that this "we" you are referring to does not mean the community of historical science, but something else entirely. I'll stop trying to prick your echo chamber now. – DevSolar Sep 27 at 15:04
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    It is somewhat interesting that you put so high notions on western entertainment produce. while being so dismissive of "western academia" at the same time. So... is the hip hop by Prodigy part of the historical discourse (and hence, by definition, at least partially academic, more specifically "western" academic, in nature), or not academic -- and hence part of history, but not historic discourse? You've painted yourself into a corner there... – DevSolar Sep 28 at 11:28
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    You sure have an axe to grind there. Good luck bending reality to your views. Here's to hope that you don't bend too many others to your hate. – DevSolar Sep 29 at 10:02