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I have been reading about the 12 battles of the Isonzo river during .

I believe it is an extreme statistic to have 12 battles in the same place during the same war.

Are there any instances of there being more battles in the same place during the same war than the 12 battles of the Isonzo river?

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    This may come down to how you define and name a single battle. In your example, these were events along a 60-mile front - not what I'd immediately call "the same place". – Steve Bird Oct 16 '17 at 11:41
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    If you consider such a front is the same place and the various phases as separate battles, then the battles of the Somme, Ypres, or Verdun might all have more phases. WW1 was uniquely static, so it's unlikely you'll find engagements that had more phases outside of 1914-18. – Denis de Bernardy Oct 17 '17 at 9:42
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Though not more then 12 battles but Ypres had "only" 6 significant battles over a much smaller front then Isonzo. Though if you would count all smaller battles/offensives then you'll get a way bigger number. None of the smaller offensives are documented (well) on Wikipedia. And I'm unwilling to add them without reliable sources.

All battles were along a frontline stretching no more then 15-20 miles (Langemarck to Mesines). 2 villages which lie 10-miles apart just North & South of Ypres.

I am from Ypres myself. If you have any further remarks/questions, don't hesitate to put them into comment. I'll be happy to elaborate my answer

Note: I'll try to find some reliable links on the net for the smaller battles and then i'll add them to the list.

Edit: This might be the best list i've found so far about the Ypres Salient

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    This answer would benefit from a comparison between the battle of Ypres and the battles of the Somme or that of Verdun. (Not saying the answer is wrong, but if it is it may leave the notion to readers who aren't familiar with those other two war theaters that Ypres is not in the same league, when in reality all three were arguably just as static and horrific.) – Denis de Bernardy Oct 17 '17 at 21:36
  • @DenisdeBernardy I believe you're right. Only i'm not quite as familiar with the events in Verdun/Somme. Its gonna take me some time make this list complete. – User999999 Oct 18 '17 at 6:46
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Harper's Ferry changed hands several times during the US Civil War, each time due to military maneuvers and possibly combat.

Some places in the Shenandoah Valley are alleged to have changed hands dozens of times during the US Civil War - Winchester and Front Royale if I remember correctly. Naturally it would take a bit of research to check how many times those places actually changed hands. And more research to see how many times there was at least a skirmish when the place changed hands.

From the beginning of the Civil War until the Union forces permanently reoccupied the town on July 8, 1864, the Harpers Ferry changed hands fourteen times. During the times that it escaped control from either army, the inhabitants of Harpers Ferry remained subject to frequent reconnaissance missions and guerrilla raids. Although no major battle was fought at Harpers Ferry after Stonewall Jackson’s attack on the garrison in 1862, by the end of the Civil War the town was devastated by repeated attempts from both Union and Confederate forces to control the vital transportation hub. Shortly after the war, Harpers Ferry resident Jessie E. Johnson spoke to the instability of Harpers Ferry, writing that “When the Union army came they called the citizens Rebels – when the Confederates came they called them Yankees.”

https://www.civilwar.org/learn/articles/10-facts-harpers-ferry1

Located in the Shenandoah Valley, Winchester was the most contested town in the Confederacy during the American Civil War (1861–1865), changing hands more than seventy times and earning its reputation (in the words of a British observer) as the shuttlecock of the Confederacy. Three major battles were fought within town limits and four others nearby.

https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Winchester_During_the_Civil_War2

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