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I remember reading somewhere that at a certain point in history thanks to archaic steel an enemy of Rome had swords that could cut through armor with ease causing a large change in Roman military but I forgot which country it was.

  • Welcome to History:SE. What has your research shown you so far? Have you looked on Google or Wikipedia? You might find it helpful to review the site tour and Help Centre and, in particular, How to Ask. – sempaiscuba Nov 16 '17 at 14:09
  • What has preliminary research revealed? – Mark C. Wallace Nov 16 '17 at 14:15
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    Not much mainly because i don't know what to search exactly as i forgot the name of the country that forced romans to make the changes. – Maiko Chikyu Nov 16 '17 at 14:19
  • Some more information would be helpful. What time period are we discussing? "Rome" lasted quite a while. That said, are you perhaps referring to the Dacians? Off the top of my head I think of Trajan's wars in Dacia, which inspired them to reinforce their helmets and wear manica (armor which extends down their right arm) as well as wear greaves (at least so we surmise from limited depictions of that campaign). – pluckedkiwi Nov 16 '17 at 15:00
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You may be thinking of Dacia and their Falx.

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The falx may have defeated Roman armor more by form and use(as a two-handed weapon) then by superior steel however.

The book The Dacian Threat, by Michael Schmitz discusses this on page 39. Some of the upgrades caused included:

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    Did you know Thank you is too short to be a comment... – justCal Nov 16 '17 at 16:13
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    @justCal And with good reason, since comments like that are discouraged. If you appreciate a question, an answer, or a comment, but have nothing meaningful to add to it - an upvote is enough. – Danila Smirnov Nov 17 '17 at 5:41
  • If I remember well Gallic Tribes also had superior armors and weapons. But I'm not sure they produced so many changes in Roman military tactics and/or equipment. – xrorox Nov 28 '17 at 17:13
  • @xrorox: TheGallic tribes induced the Marian reforms following the Battle of Noreia. – Pieter Geerkens Jul 3 '18 at 16:42

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