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Is it true that in Medieval Times kings used to invite other king for a feast and poison other king's drink? this became so prevelant that the guest king would clink his glass with the host king's glass so that some of the liquid in his glass spills into the guest's glass, or did pirates do it?

When, where and why the tradition of clinking glasses and saying cheers started?

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    No one knows for sure. – Steve Bird Dec 21 '17 at 6:08
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    What preliminary research have you done? – Mark C. Wallace Dec 21 '17 at 9:08
  • @MarkC.Wallace, my preliminary research says that what I have written in my question may not be true, but my logic is in favour of it, why don't we do the same thing while eating or drinking tea/coffee/fruit juice? – Vikram Dec 21 '17 at 9:45
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    Please document your research in your question and your reason for doubting the existing narrative. – Mark C. Wallace Dec 21 '17 at 9:49
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    used to invite other king for a feast and poison other king's drink? If kings used to do this, it seems reasonable that "the other kings" would stop going to these feasts, isn't it? Apart from other issues (chivalry code, risk of setting bad example for your subjects, etc.) I would dare to say that it was not "usual" at all. – SJuan76 Dec 21 '17 at 14:20

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