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The following document is a picture of a copy of the autopsy report of Empress Elisabeth of Austria, on display in the Sisi Museum in Vienna. It describes, in French, the wounds and the cause of death of the Empress.

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While the content of this document is quite intelligible, I am intrigued by the word “Verte!” (French for “Green!”) in the bottom right corner of the page.

Does anyone have an explanation for the presence of this word?

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Comparing both autopsies archived officially at (AT-OeStA/HHStA UR FUK 2790, 2791 Title: Zwei nach dem Ableben der Kaiserin und Königin Elisabeth aufgenommene legalisierte Protokolle über die stattgehabte Leichenschau und Autopsie (Obduktion) (1898.09.12)) reveals that they are consisting of more pages than are visible in the picture above. Both went through multiple hands and this is also visible by the numerous seals and impressions and additions with pencils and so on.

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The handwriting of them is vastly different when comparing the "body text". Yet both documents have this "verte" at the end of the page. (Like another example.)

In my eyes the hand is also different from the body text and might be from someone different, a civil servant or who knows.

Actually it is not French "green" but Latin, verte: Imp. Sg. meaning just "turn around!" (that is: turn [over] this page). This was actually a standard phrase for these occasions.

  • Could it mean turn over (the page)? – Ne Mo Feb 14 '18 at 23:15
  • Probably to a lot of people... but not me :D – Ne Mo Feb 14 '18 at 23:28
  • So it's the equivalent of, "Continued on next page"? – jpmc26 Feb 15 '18 at 3:37
  • More like the equivalent of P.T.O. – RedGrittyBrick Feb 15 '18 at 10:42

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