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Before 1949 Newfoundland was a separate country from Canada and both Newfoundland and Canada were "dominions". In Canada the status of a "dominion" meant that it was an independent country except that its constitution could be amended only by the British Parliament, and in particular it sent and received ambassadors. Did Newfoundland also send and receive ambassadors?

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    Dominion actually meant self-government ("responsible government") originally, not that it was an "independent country", although all dominions gradually became that. So none of the Dominions were permitted to conduct independent foreign affairs, including establishing embassies, until the 1930s. Newfoundland, whose Dominion status was suspended when it gave up self-rule, missed the boat (I personally wouldn't consider internal British Empire representation diplomatic missions in this period). – Semaphore Mar 12 '18 at 10:26
  • @Semaphore : So does that mean Canada did not have embassies until the 1930s? – Michael Hardy Mar 12 '18 at 15:10
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    Well... it's complicated. Canada's first diplomatic mission was to Washington D.C., in 1927, but that was technically only a Legation (headed by an Envoy). The first Ambassador was officially appointed only in 1943, at which point the legation became an Embassy. – Semaphore Mar 12 '18 at 15:44
  • @Semaphore: That would be by the Statute of Westminster (as also here re Australia) I presume. – Pieter Geerkens Mar 13 '18 at 12:33
  • @Semaphore : Perhaps you should post an answer. And maybe it can clarify how it is that if "none of the Dominions were permitted to conduct independent foreign affairs, including establishing embassies, until the 1930s" then it is also the case that the Canadians established a legation in Washington in the '20s. – Michael Hardy Mar 14 '18 at 0:43
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The Dominion of Newfoundland sent High Commissioners to the United Kingdom from 1918 to 1934 when the Dominion was abolished[1]. It is of note that, unlike other Dominions of the United Kingdom including Canada, the United Kingdom did not send a High Commissioner to the Dominion of Newfoundland.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_commissioner_of_Newfoundland_to_the_United_Kingdom

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