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On what dates and what people were required to quit France by decree of the Legislative Assembly?


EDIT 21 April 2018

The following details were added by the OP in comments to an answer below

I have a record of birth from College of Arms London where the father Charles Montboissier Beaufort Visconti de Canillac and Philippe François D’Albignac de Castelnau Bishop of Angouleme (now residing at Richmond in Surrey) we’re both compelled to quit France by a Decree of the Legislative Assembly of that country. It appears though that Charles may have returned to France by 1794.

Charles is paternal cousin of Philippe Claude Montboisser, But Charles own details are just Charles de Montboissier-Beaufort-Canillac Marquis de Canillac (1812) Prince romain et de Montboissier-Beaufort-Canillac (1st, 1822) Vicomte de Mont......, Titre par le Pape Pie V11, Commandeur de l'Ordre Royal Militaire de St Louis, Officier de la Legion d'Honneur. Born May 1753 Chateau de Beaumont Agonges, 03002, Allier, Auvergne France. Died 21 May 1836 Paris. Contre-Amiral. Father was Edouard de Mont.... died 1764 and mother Anne Elisabeth de Troussebois Dame de Beaumont-Lafayette.

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Dates for the French Revolution: Jul 14, 1789 – Nov 9, 1799

"Non-Curing priests".

Pre-Revolutionary France was just about 100% Catholic. The Catholic Church owned sizable lands and wealth inside France. When they drafted the French Constitution, it "reorganized" the Catholic Church. Property was seized and sold with the state keeping the profits, clergy were made employees of the state, priests and bishops were to be elected by the people not appointed by Rome, The Pope refused to "approve" of this new Constitution. So the French legislature demanded all clergy in france had to swear a loyalty pledge to the New Constitution. Those that did not where referred to as "Non-Curing priests".

In August of 1792, while the french revolution was ongoing. The French Legislative Authority (The Constituent Assembly) told priests who had not taken an oath of loyalty to this French Constitution, to leave within 14 days or face deportation to French Guyana.

THE ASSEMBLY DEPORTS NON-JURING CLERGY (1792)
“The Legislative Assembly believes the unrest excited in the kingdom by priests who are not under oath is one of the major causes of danger to the fatherland. This comes at a time when all Frenchmen have need of unity, and of all their strength to drive back the external enemies, and must take all measures possible to ensure and guarantee peace within the nation… [The Assembly] decrees that there is a state of emergency…

Article 1. All clergy liable to the oath prescribed by the law of December 26th 1790 and that of April 17th 1791 who have not sworn it, or who, after having sworn it, have retracted it… will be obliged to leave the borders of their district and department of residence within eight days, and the kingdom, within a fortnight. These different deadlines will be counted from the day of publication of the present decree. They will each appear before the Directory or the Council of their district of residence, to declare to it the foreign country into which they intend to withdraw, and a passport containing their declaration, their description, the route they must take and the time within which they must have left the kingdom will be delivered to them on the spot.

Article 2. Once the 14 day deadline stipulated above has expired, those clergy not under oath who have not obeyed the above provisions will be deported to French Guyana. The district Directories will have them arrested and taken from brigade to brigade to the nearest seaport…

Article 4. Any clergyman who remains within the kingdom after having made his declaration to leave and obtained a passport, or who returns after having left, will be condemned to a punishment often years’ detention…

Article 7. Excepted from the preceding provisions are the disabled, whose disability has been recorded by an officer of health who will be designated by the general council of the town of their place of residence, and whose certificate will be verified by the same general council. Also excepted are sexagenarians whose age will also be duly recorded…”

Sources:

Originally I was thinking Thomas Paine. He was imprisoned and survived the reign of terror through a fluke. But upon researching it, he left France for America on his own terms. He was not required to by the French Legislature as stated in the question.

  • Thank you - not a homework question but I do teach so may appear school Is? – mlynne239 Mar 23 '18 at 7:10
  • But do you know anything about non clergy being exiled also- I have a record of birth from College of Arms London where the father Charles Montboissier Beaufort Visconti de Canillac and Philippe François D’Albignac de Castelnau Bishop of Angouleme (now residing at Richmond in Surrey) we’re both compelled to quit France by a Decree of the Legislative Assembly of that country. It appears though that Charles may have returned to France by 1794. – mlynne239 Mar 23 '18 at 7:17
  • Philippe François D’Albignac de Castelnau, Bishop of Angoulême would have been Clergy and "non Curing Priest" would have applied. – JMS Mar 23 '18 at 18:01
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    If you wanted a specific answer, you should have put all that information in your original question. On this board it's always wise to put all your research, context and original thinking in the question as that gives folks more to go on who are trying to provide you with an answer. I've been guilty of that myself on several occasions. I mention it because it's not unusual for vague questions to get closed and that can lead to misunderstandings and hurt feelings. – JMS Mar 23 '18 at 18:36
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    Disappointing that the OP didn't at least upvote this answer. – Lars Bosteen Apr 21 '18 at 0:47

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