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I'm having trouble finding Russia's official reason for invading the Crimea region of Ukraine. If my memory serves me right, didn't they change the reason halfway through the invasion?

closed as off-topic by Franz Drollig, KorvinStarmast, Jos, Pieter Geerkens, José Carlos Santos Aug 1 '18 at 6:44

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    Assuming you are talking about the 2014 events (hardly "hisory" yet; still ongoing events). Officially, Russia never invaded, rather independantist forces rebelled, proclaimed Crimea's independance and only THEN voted it's integration into Russia as a federal subject. – Bregalad Jul 31 '18 at 16:13
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    Also this is an almost duplicate of this question : politics.stackexchange.com/questions/10824/… – Bregalad Jul 31 '18 at 16:14
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it has been already answered here. – Franz Drollig Jul 31 '18 at 18:43
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    Sorry I didn't see that question in politics. Thanks – Gabriel Fair Jul 31 '18 at 20:46
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    @GabrielFair officially, Russia never invaded Ukraine, nor are they occupying Ukraine today. Officially according to Russia ethnic Russian rose up and revolted to the Ukraine's ambition to seek closer ties to the West. Russia is silent on the fact that the ethnic Russians were wearing Russian Uniforms and riding in Russian tanks and transports. Also silent on numerous Russian military Facebook pages sporting photographs of the invasion. – JMS Aug 3 '18 at 0:23
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At the time, there was no reason given, for the simple fact that Russia wasn't openly doing it. The Russian troops being used to take over strategic points (including the Crimean parliament) in the Crimean region of Ukraine were unmarked, and referred to by the locals as "little green men".

The official Russian line at this time was that the little green men must be locals, and if their weapons were Russian, they must have stolen them. This remained the story until after a referendum under the military control of the Russian troops showed that the local Crimeans loved Russia and wanted to join.

The Referendum in question happened on March 16, and a month after that, Putin was admitting Russian Special Forces had been used to allow that referendum to happen.

On Thursday, when asked about the soldiers widely known as the green men, Putin acknowledged that they were Russian. Their presence had been necessary, he said, to keep order so that Crimeans could decide their future in a referendum.

“We didn’t want any tanks, any nationalist combat units or people with extreme views armed with automatic weapons,” he said. “Of course, Russian servicemen backed the Crimean self-defense forces.”

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