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Can someone help me identifying these two old coins found in India? They are made of copper. They are very thick and weigh around 10 grams.

Both the coins have a diameter of 1.5cm and thickness of 0.5cm. They aren't perfectly round as you can see in the images. These are 2 of around 300 coins found in Aravali hills in Haryana, India. Mining was being done in mountains and they were found in a pot inside the mountain at a large distance from surface of mountain. They were found when 50 trolleys of rocks had been removed from mountain.

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    Hi and welcome to History SE. It might help us to help you if you could give the dimensions and tell us in what context they were found. Also, they are a little out of focus. Any chance of better quality photos? – Lars Bosteen Sep 19 '18 at 3:23
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    I suggest using a piece of plain white paper for a photo background. – Spencer Sep 19 '18 at 18:29
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It has Arabesque inscriptions so it is minted by one of the Muslim Kingdoms or Empires. They are similar in style to Suri/Mughal coinage

Your first coin is upside down. By setting it right we get the result:

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The encircled words are the only ones readable in the inscription. They read Sultan Ibrahim. (السلطان ابراھیم).

There's only one monarch by that name who ruled from the nearby Delhi. That is Sultan Ibrahim Khan Lodhi of Delhi Sultanate who was deposed by Babur in 1526. Wikipedia's only image for his coinage is decisively different but that could be difference between two mints or two different coins. Interestingly Ibrahim's grandfather, Sultan Bahlul Lodhi's and his father Sikandar Khan Lodhi's coins were minted in a similar fashion. Pictured below, The coins from the respective Sultan's eras (Notice in particular Sultan Bahlul's coin, it follows the same pattern with Title Below, Name above and bits of the name cropping out):

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The second image you shared is not readable at least by me, due to words cropping. I did some crude reconstuction based on some words readable (Which is mere conjecture). It gives the name of Alau-Din-Khilji, Sultan of Delhi who ruled 2 centuries before Ibrahim:

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Third and fourth (Although it does look similar to the Wiki's photo for Ibrahim Lodhi's quarter Tanka) are even worse. There's a lot of mud on them, if you could perhaps clean them and (Don't clean them, you might end up damaging them - Credits to Peter Taylor for pointing it out) upload the photos again, I'd have a better chance to read them (Make sure your camera's focus is correct and on point). So Ibrahim Lodhi is the best guess for the moment.

  • @DikshitGautam The Meem is written in a different way (Which is very normal in Muslim coins). This will help. The Meem (م) is not written all the way to bottom, rather expanded horizontally to make room for The Alif and Noon of Sultan below it. Also the yay between Hay and Meem is missing just like Alif and Noon of Sultan due to time and corrosion. It is still evident to any native speaker what do the words say. – NSNoob Sep 19 '18 at 8:49
  • @DikshitGautam It is hard to say especially since I am not a professional. You might want to clear up legal concerns first (The mine owners or the Government might have a claim to it). The first coin at least is very old (And appears to be authentic if your story of its excavation is true). For example, Jahangir's heavy gold coins can go up to 17k GBP. But your coins are not gold so they might only fetch a grand or a couple of grands. I can only guess. You might wanna check with your local museum. – NSNoob Sep 19 '18 at 9:18
  • Numismall is selling Lodhi coins for 17 USD which is suspiciously low. They must be counterfeits imo but maybe its a market effect, Mughals are famous so everyone wants their coins, Lodhis never reached those heights so interest in their coins, outside museums might be low hence the low price – NSNoob Sep 19 '18 at 9:19
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    Are you sure it's a good idea to clean the coins? That is usually considered anathema by numismatists unless verdigris is present. – Peter Taylor Sep 19 '18 at 15:59
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    @DikshitGautam, I would advise you to get local legal advice before selling. As far as I can tell, India was planning to repeal pre-independence law on treasure trove, but hasn't actually done so, so you may effectively be forced to sell to the government. See this news story from last February: outlookindia.com/website/story/… – Peter Taylor Sep 20 '18 at 19:40

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