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Found this in my late father's possessions. Probably belonged to his father or grandfather. Prussian? German? war related? I have no idea...nothing on the back. looks like acorn/oak on target. green cross.

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    Is there anything at all on the reverse side? – Lars Bosteen Jan 5 at 7:19
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    It appears to me that there might still be ribbon attached and hidden by your fingers. If so, that ribbon is an intrinsic part of the medal, whether military or not, and will make identification both easier and more definitive. Please advise – Pieter Geerkens Jan 5 at 8:21
  • Very nice job on the quality high resolution image BTW. – Pieter Geerkens Jan 5 at 8:27
  • nothing on the reverse side @LarsBosteen – Tim Jan 9 at 11:49
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    no ribbon attached @PieterGeerkens – Tim Jan 9 at 11:50
6

This looks like one of the various marksmanship medals (Schützenorden) issued by many shooting clubs (Schützenvereine) in German-speaking countries.

Compare for example this image search.

  • If that flower image in the centre is a stylized edelweiss I'd be checking shooting clubs in the Tyrol around Salzburg. – Pieter Geerkens Jan 5 at 11:44
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    @PieterGeerkens These are oak-leaves and oak fruits in front of a marksman's target disk. That's pretty generic. The point you raised below the Q however might be important, a crown indicates a year's competition winner (obscured by fingers). Without more info from inscriptions (backside?) it's improbable to pinpoint. Just that's not real military. – LangLangC Jan 5 at 15:29
  • @LangLangC: Ha ha! So right you are. I learned to distinguish white from black oak leaves at six, and should have spotted that myself. Acorns and oaks are a heraldic symbol of royalty however, so that might suggest a royal (as contrasted with mere noble) charter for the club. That suggests Berlin, Munich, Vienna as locales. – Pieter Geerkens Jan 5 at 16:11
  • @PieterGeerkens Not really, I guess. The leaves are just Germanic, and a woods symbol. But royal insofar The 'winner' of one such competition is called king of marksmen. Compare this description of acorns to achievments or this catalog or this aficionado breast from Lower Saxony – LangLangC Jan 5 at 18:02
  • @LangLangC No date inscription anywhere. (and my father did live in the Berlin area for time). – Tim Jan 9 at 11:58

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