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According to this article (Russian), in June 1945 General Serov reported to Beriia about the following incident.

On May 28th, 1945, a Red Army soldier was shot at by someone from a window in Berlin’s district Prenzlauer Berg. The military police took several inhabitants of the house to the commandant’s office for interrogation.

Rumors spread among the Germans, that the Soviets would stop distributing free food because of that shot. After a while, several delegations of Germans came to the commandant’s office. All of them offered the same thing: To take 30–40 hostages and publicly shoot them. In exchange the Germans wanted the Soviets to continue to give away free food.

Did this actually happen?

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    How would you know except by testimony of witnesses? Did the article give a source for this information? Does the source give names for these delegations? OTOH, most likely it is anti-German propaganda, produced by the Soviets. You might want to do some research on the reputation of the magazine. As one comment stated: "Thank you for the article. If possible, please provide sources." – Peter Diehr Jan 26 at 20:41
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    The "source" is the blog of some private individual. – fdb Jan 26 at 20:50
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    @PeterDiehr "How would you know"? You would know doing what historians do or searching what historians have done. The question is perfectly legit and could be read as: Was actually this article published? Are there other accounts of the fact? How credible are those sources? Have historians researched on that alleged incident? Have been similar incidents recorded? Are there conflicting reports? Is likely that a Soviet soldier had been shot in Prenzlauer Berg? Was usual for Soviet troops to shot civilians in retaliation for such an incident? – Pere Jan 26 at 23:21
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    Of course, the answer to some of those questions can be that there aren't enough sources and the incident can't be proved nor disproved. – Pere Jan 26 at 23:22

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