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Following up on the question Public knowledge of hypothetical nuclear weapons before Hiroshima?:

I recall reading (many many years ago) an autobiographical anecdote by a science fiction author who was unable to check his own work out of a public library due to insufficient security clearance. I seem to recall that this occurred during World War 2, but it is possible it happened in the late 1940's or early 1950's.

Does anyone recall who this author was, and which story or novel was involved? Most of my once extensive SF collection disappeared with my ex, which inhibits my research on this.


Update - from my comment below

Okay - I implied (through the attached question) but failed to make explicitly clear that it was a story/novel involving knowledge of nuclear fission - yet not any of those stories currently referenced in that question.

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    There can't be many countries that require a security clearance to check a book out of a public library, so that might narrow down the field... – Steve Bird Feb 2 at 19:45
  • @SteveBird: That's part of why I recall it being during WW2 - when much basic science surrounding nuclear fission was officially classified despite already being common knowledge amongst the scientifically literate. – Pieter Geerkens Feb 2 at 19:49
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    So you believe that this was due to the science content of the book rather than any political ideas it might contain? Might be worth asking over on the SciFi SE too. – Steve Bird Feb 2 at 20:28
  • @SteveBird: Okay - I implied (through the attached question) but failed to make explicitly clear that it was a story/novel involving knowledge of nuclear fission - yet not any of those stories currently referenced in that question. I will amend that oversight now. – Pieter Geerkens Feb 2 at 20:42
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    And I looked into Asimov and Heinlein directly first (Clarke as well), didn't see anything. It still seems like something Asimov might have said though. – justCal Feb 2 at 23:19
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I'm not sure if this is it but Philip Wylie was put under house arrest in 1945 due to his writing being too close to atomic secrecy. That's not quite the same thing but he couldn't check out his own books while this was going on: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Wylie

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