0

I was thinking about this for a while. I know that the US never intended to abolish slavery at that time, but it still happened. Is that even relevant?

Some of the things I thought that they originally set out to do is take over the western NA (manifest destiny) and obviously cut ties with Britain after the Revolution. The former was satisfied but didn't the US still keep trading with Britain?

The idea of offering liberty and "all men created equal" outlined in the Declaration/Consitution was somewhat solved with all men being able to vote under the 15th amendment, but women's suffrage and racism was still a rising issue, one of which is not even solved today!

I cannot think of any other huge things that the US set to do, whether it was satisfied or not.

closed as primarily opinion-based by justCal, Italian Philosopher, SJuan76, Steve Bird, José Carlos Santos May 30 at 6:25

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

"The US" doesn't really exist. What has existed are a bunch of people who made various compacts about how things should work. As such, "the US" didn't set out to be anything. A bunch of people had some ideas, often at odds with each other, and reached various compromises to create compacts around an idea called "the United States". Then they died, and their children, with their own ideas, often at odds with each other, reached various compromises, modifying these compacts. This chain of generations has gone on for a couple centuries, until those of us who are residents of the United States, each with our own ideas, reach compromises with each other around those compacts called "the United States".

All countries are like this.

Our ancestors would be amazed at some of what we've done, horrified at some of what we've done and smugly satisfied at some of what we've done.

Some of what our decendents will do would amaze us. Some of it would horrify us. Some of it would leave us smugly satisfied.

To be more specific: Some of the founding fathers very much wanted to abolish slavery. Others did not. It took nearly a century to work that out.

With regards to "manifest destiny": some people very much believed in it. Others were very much opposed.

With regard to trade with Britain: some people wanted to align with Britain almost immediately. Others wanted to align with France. This was actually one of the core conflicts that drove the creation of the first parties.

Countries don't "set out" to do anything, even those founded, at least in theory, on philosophical principals.

  • But when the founding fathers created the nation they must have had some ideas in mind that they wanted to further. – Vikram Kaushik May 31 at 1:32
  • Each founding father had ideas about what he wanted to further. But what Hamilton, as an example, wanted to further was very different from what Jefferson wanted to further. – Gort the Robot May 31 at 2:37

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.