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I wonder if there are depictions of horsemen who sit on the horses, with the horses that have two fore (front) hooves up in the air other than on the coins made in the time when Rome was a republic.

There is a depiction of such a statue on one of the coins (see below), but I could not find any statues, reliefs, mosaics etc. that date before Augustus came to power. There are many that were produced when Rome was an empire.

If indeed there were not any created when Rome was a republic, why? Or were they lost/destroyed?

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There are.

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Monument of Aemilius Paullus was erected in the Sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi shortly after 167 BCE in order to commemorate the Roman victory at the Battle of Pydna over King Perseus of Macedon.

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— David Gibbins: "Destroy Carthage: The Triumph Of Aemilius Paullus", 2013.

— Jeremiah B. McCall: "The Cavalry Of The Roman Republic. Cavalry combat and elite reputations in the middle and late Republic", Routledge: London, New York, 2002.

enter image description here — Roman mausoleum of Julii at Glanum, north face (1st century BC) (Glanum)

Interesting then how this looked on the Gundestrup cauldron (richly decorated silver vessel, thought to date [… ] or more narrowly between 150 BC and 1 BC):

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— M.C. Bishop: "Cavalry Equipment of the Roman Army in the First Century A.D.", in: J.C. Coulston (ed.): "Military Equipment and the Identity of Roman Soldiers. Proceedings of the Fourth Roman Military Equipment Conference", BAR International Series 394, Oxford, 1988. (PDF)

Since I gather that not only strictly military depictions in full armor are requested:

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The front of an alabaster cinerary urn: horsemen and musicians arrive at a tomb. Date 100BC (circa). British Museum number 1925,1218.1 equestrian parade; lictor with fasces visible top left; right, preparations for sacrifice, with victimarius holding ram or sheep and flute player and lyre player at podium temple (triton? giant? in pediment). London, British Museum. (Photo from DAIR 40.817.)

Of specia interest will be the slightly fuzzy dated, but certainly at least touching the timeframe

The "Bronzi Dorati da Cartoceto di Pergola" is the only group of gilded bronzes in the world dating from Ancient Roman times still in existence. They most likely represent a family group, originally two female figures, cloaked and veiled, and two horsemen in high-ranking military garb with richly ornamented horses.

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Based on the style, the statues are thought to be from the late Republican age, probably the 1st century BC or 1st century AD. — Museum of Roman Gilded Bronzes. Rare Ancient Roman Life-Size Statues

There are quite a few Roman copies of Greek sculptures, for which the 'originals' have to be dated quite early. Some other sculptures and reliefs are dated with uncertainties, or sometimes just 'confusingly'. For example, the monument tomb of Tiberius Flavius Miccalus is on the web almost always given as 1st century BC,

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but the supposedly more reliable Arachne database lists it as 1st century AD:

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The following was a good faith submission made before OP clarified the question to be about non-numismatic depictions.


A search for "horses" in the British Museum's catalogue of Roman Republican coins quickly turns up this entry of horses prancing from the period 194-190 B.C.:

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    Thank you! I was after the depictions other than on the coins though, and with the rider(s) sitting on the horse(s). I have found maybe 8 coins like this, but only coins, no other types of objects. I will edit my question to make it clearer. – Yulia V Dec 21 '19 at 9:15
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    I have only put in bold other than on the coins in the first paragraph, it was in the original version of the question. Would you be able to check the edit history to see this? I would not do the impolite thing you are accusing me of :) – Yulia V Dec 21 '19 at 9:37
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    I can un-edit it, which will be the same, but then other people might miss the "other than on the coins" caveat, and also give me the information about the coins that I know already. So should we really do this edit? – Yulia V Dec 21 '19 at 9:42
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    Also, I have just checked the dictionary definition of the word "horseman", and this is the person on a horseback - lexico.com/en/definition/horseman - so my second edit also does not change the question, only makes it clearer... – Yulia V Dec 21 '19 at 9:44
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    @YuliaV: Okay - got it now. I've added a note to my answer, as the British museum search might be valuable info. – Pieter Geerkens Dec 21 '19 at 10:14

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