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It's sitting in front of Escuela Militar in Lima, Peru. Looks like a 1930's French or British tank/tankette (Bolivia used some UK tanks in a war in the 30s). Not in the AMR3x series as far as I could tell. Note what looks like a Renault FT17 track - higher in the front than in the back, but less pronounced. Looks like possibly a water cooled machine gun rather than the stubby low-velocity low-caliber guns typical of the interwar tanks. Quite small.

edit: it only looked a bit like the FT17's higher front, but then looking more closely at the photograph, it looks like the 2nd front and 2nd last bogie are the same size. I didn't think it was a FT17, merely something that might have come out from the same design bureau 10 yrs later.

k

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Panzer 38(t)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panzer_38(t)#Peru

They were apparently the only tanks Peru had in the war with Ecuador, bought by a Peruvian mission to Europe. The size of the wheels match, it is not a Vickers or FT17.

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    Better known as Pz 38, they started as ČKD LT vz. 38, a Czechoslovak-designed tank, that Germany gained when France+UK sold out. Very reliable, quite widely used in the invasion of France. Turret's too small to upgun much, so not used much when T34s started to bite. However the chassis was made into Marder3 and Jagdpz 38 tank destroyers - a big contributor to late-war German AT strength. Supposedly "used" against Shining Path, though that might have meant just security in urban centers by then - truly a B-52 among tanks. Also manufactured under license by Sweden. – Italian Philosophers 4 Monica Dec 28 '19 at 16:20
  • @ItalianPhilosophers4Monica It especially shines in context - the tanks the Germans had at the time they got access to the Czechoslovakian designs could be penetrated by heavy machine guns. It's also illuminating how many of the German panzers failed while annexing Austria, which was a relatively peaceful operation, making use of local fuel supply etc. Germany would probably do fine even without them thanks to their overwhelming air force, but the Czechoslovakian tanks were a huge boon to German war effort. – Luaan Dec 29 '19 at 9:11

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