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I had never thought of this before. I know that some states do not allow people with intellectual disability to vote. Interestingly, it was not until 1964 that deaf women were allowed to vote it appears in elections within their own organization for the National Association of the Deaf. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deaf_history. I can find no indication that deaf adult males were ever prevented in voting in US elections but that may be false. As far as blind people, I wonder if literacy exams were used against them even if they could read braille.

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    I believe you have misunderstood - that does not refer to suffrage in national or state elections, but only to internal elections of the National Association of the Deaf. Helen Keller was an outspoken advocate for booth Women's Suffrage, and Socialism - if she had not been allowed to vote on account of her disability - we would still be hearing about it. – Pieter Geerkens Mar 14 '20 at 5:04
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    I completely understood. What I am wondering about if at anytime people who would except for deafness or blindness would be allowed to vote: they were old enough and male (prior to women's suffrage) and white, etc. but were not due to this disability. It is in fact interesting to note the discrimination against women in the deaf community, something I would be interested in learning more about and whether perhaps in the blind community women were similarly discriminated against. – releseabe Mar 14 '20 at 9:41
  • @PieterGeerkens "if she had not been allowed to vote on account of her disability - we would still be hearing about it." Of course, she wouldn't. – Acccumulation Mar 16 '20 at 2:08

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