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I've tried looking in various places online and have been unable to find when in US history we have had nationwide deployments of the National Guards? Where can I find this out? Or do you know?

Edit: As per comments, I want to clarify a) trying to find when the N. G. was deployed to every state b) I've browsed through the first 5 pages of Google results for "nationwide deployments of US National Guards" as well as browsed some Wikipedia articles, which articles specifically I no longer remember.

  • Hi Serj Sagan and welcome to History SE. Please tell us where you have looked so that folks here don't waste time looking in places you've already checked out. Thanks. – Lars Bosteen Mar 31 at 9:00
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    Depending on how you phrase the details, it is unlikely to have ever happened. Until 2006, National Guard units were under the control of State Governors. A nationwide deployment would have required coordinated activity by all the state Governors. A brief review of the relevant Wikipedia:National Guard page indicates no such event. – Mark C. Wallace Mar 31 at 9:18
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    This may have happened during Hurricane Katrina, when the National Guard was mobilised via the web of Emergency Management Assistance Compacts. nationalguard.mil states that: "Army and Air Guard members from every state, territory, and the District of Columbia gave assistance to Gulf Coast states". However, the Wikipedia article says "65,000 personnel from 48 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands were deployed under EMAC . . . in response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita". – Semaphore Mar 31 at 12:21
  • The last truly national scale disaster internal to the US was the 1918 flu pandemic. With Katrina, I think the question is whether the OP means that the National Guard was deployed from all states or to all states. – Gort the Robot Mar 31 at 22:07

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