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As far as I know, Europeans quarantined people. Sometimes neighbors sent food, and some people checked and marked houses infected by the Black Death. Sometimes corpses were burned in a mass pit, and sometimes the entire house or village was burned.

How did China manage the Black Death pandemic? I haven't found anything regarding this on Google.

Later I may add questions regarding other locations too. However this SE has a weird point of view regarding what is considered to be a duplicate. So just in case, a warning in the comments would be appreciated, if the same question with a different location would still be considered a duplicate or something.

Feel free to edit my grammar and to correct the tags to whatever is appropriate, since I don't know which tags are appropriate for this.

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    My cents (worth less than a penny) are that if your question is the same but about a different location, it's not a duplicate -- because most answers are location specific. Many might disagree with me. – gktscrk May 27 at 12:28
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    This Bulletin of the History of Medicine article Was the Black Death in India and China? argues that the Black Death may not have affected China (i.e. what afflicted China was not related to what afflicted Europe); although there were epidemics, descriptions of symptoms are lacking in 14th century records, and the spread of the epidemics was unlike that in Europe (large areas were not affected). Also, the timing doesn't fit. – Lars Bosteen May 27 at 12:48
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    To avoid edit wars, lets adopt this convention, suggested by @gktscrk, and consistently capitalize Black Death. – Mark C. Wallace May 27 at 12:57
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    Dunstan's 1975 article details evidence for early modern epidemics in China as well as containment and management efforts (pages 32-35). These are limited to providing free medical care, organizing the burial of the bodies, and religious ceremonies believed to have a tangible impact. She finds no evidence for quarantine measures in the epidemics of the 16th and 17th centuries, but mentions a travel ban imposed in some cases in the 12th century (p. 33).... – 0range May 27 at 14:02
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    @MarkC.Wallace: I refer to this -- the Black Death in the question is clearly asked in the context of a specific event (as in the plague in the 14th century) and not as a generic term for all plagues. Also, Wiktionary specifies that it is a proper noun. Your link above also implied the same. – gktscrk May 28 at 7:12
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We may not yet know:

On the heels of the European epidemic, a widespread disaster occurred in China during 1353–1354. Chinese accounts of this wave of the disease record a spread to eight distinct areas: Hubei, Jiangxi, Shanxi, Hunan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Henan, and Suiyuan,12 throughout the Mongol and Chinese empires. Historian William McNeill noted that voluminous Chinese records on disease and social disruption survive from this period, but no one has studied these sources in depth.13 Wikipedia:black death

I'm not a China scholar, but does this sound like a dissertation topic for some eager young scholar? On the other hand, as the following two comments suggest, there may be a very solid reason why there is no scholarship of the plague in China in this period; because there may not have been a plague in China in this period!

Strong hat tip to @Brian-Z, who points out,

"a close examination of the sources on [...] the Yuan Dynasty provides [...] no specific evidence of plague among the many troubles that afflicted fourteenth-century China." Was the Black Death in India and China?

@0range adds,

I find Dunstan's 1975 article more instructive, especially pages 32-35. Although she focuses on the early modern period, not the 14th century (the second plague pandemic) the OP asked about, it appears that the this period (the late Ming epidemics 1580-1650) are the earliest clear evidence for bubonic plague in China. As Sussman's article (linked by BrianZ) says, there is no clear evidence for plague in China in the 14th century.

(I'm updating the question because comments are barn cats and both individuals deserve credit for significantly adding to my understanding of the situation.. Alas, I can't give bounty to a comment)

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    This article goes a little further to say that "a close examination of the sources on [...] the Yuan Dynasty provides [...] no specific evidence of plague among the many troubles that afflicted fourteenth-century China." – Brian Z May 27 at 13:08
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    I find Dunstan's 1975 article more instructive, especially pages 32-35. Although she focuses on the early modern period, not the 14th century (the second plague pandemic) the OP asked about, it appears that the this period (the late Ming epidemics 1580-1650) are the earliest clear evidence for bubonic plague in China. As Sussman's article (linked by BrianZ) says, there is no clear evidence for plague in China in the 14th century. – 0range May 27 at 14:07
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    Worth noting, I think, that the work of William McNeill which Wikipedia cites on Chinese sources not having been studied in depth was published almost 45 years ago. It's reasonable to assume that at least some progress in this area has been made since then. – Lars Bosteen May 27 at 23:06

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