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According to Wikipedia the first known references to tea occured in the 9th century, when Buddhist monks introduced tea, a drink made from Camellia sinensis to Japan.

The Camellia variety sinensis is not native to Japan, (or not considered so, anyways,) but there are actually other Camellia species that are native to Japan, such as japonica and sasanqua, and they can be used to make a similar tea beverage. Japonica is pretty much in the name, sasanqua is native to China and Japan.

I wonder why there seems to be no apparent evidence that these other plants were used before Camellia sinensis.

Also, something about the ancient writing systems of Jindai Moji—in reference to what is little known about ancient Japan, even though many believe the entireity of these these writing systems are more recent forgeries.

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    Do you have a source that mentions japonica and sasanqua as being native to Japan? And what exactly is the relevance of "something about the ancient writing systems of Jindai Moji"? – Brian Z Jul 18 '20 at 13:44
  • Japonica is pretty much in the name, sasanqua is native to China and Japan. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camellia_sasanqua en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camellia_japonica Jindai Moji is in reference to what is little known about ancient Japan, even though many believe the entireity of these these writing systems are more recent forgeries. – RakeALeaf Jul 18 '20 at 16:47
  • I edited your comment into the question, but it sounds like it should stand alone. Do you mean it as a Q&A on what is presently made of the Jindai Moji or is it linked to tea in some way? – gktscrk Jul 19 '20 at 5:34
  • It's not really linked to tea, it's just (maybe) related to ancient Japan in general. – RakeALeaf Jul 19 '20 at 16:19

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