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Apologies if this is in the wrong stack site, I couldn't think of a more appropriate place for it.

I live in the UK. We're known for having mostly switched to the metric system except for a few specific applications here and there. When it comes to food, the only two food items I can think of that are still measured using the imperial system are milk and beer, both measured in pints.

It seems that the government could have easily mandated both of those industries to start using metric as with every other food manufacturer, so I'm wondering for what reasons this was never done.

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    Well, bread is still sold in loaves, which I'm guessing is an even older unit of measure. – KillingTime Jul 25 '20 at 19:57
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    Many market traders still sell loose fruit and veg by the pound, although by law they are required to have scales that display both metric and imperial units. Perhaps you could edit your question to explain what you think is missing from, or incomplete about, the Wikipedia article on metrication in the UK? – sempaiscuba Jul 25 '20 at 19:58
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    @Lucian The Weights and Measures Act 1898 first allowed for metric units to be used alongside Imperial units. Various EU regulations accelerated the process in the 1980s (with the original intention that only metric units would be permitted from 1989, although the EU has backed off on that, and decided to permit dual-labelling indefinitely in 2007). It remains to be seen what effect, if any, Brexit will have. 122 years after the 1898 Act, the process of metrication in the UK remains a work-in-progress. – sempaiscuba Jul 25 '20 at 20:08
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    ...and in the anti-metric United States, we somehow ended up buying our soda in liters. – Gort the Robot Jul 26 '20 at 1:37
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    lol, depends where you say it (two halfs pls) that argument reminds me of a situation from my youth. An englishman, when I asked him "So why do you drive on the left side ?" he asked back "Fron which side do you mount a horse ?". As if the one had to do with the other and many horses weren't underway even the 70s. I doubt the question can be answered at all without constructing arguments, or saying "Because it's half-hearted politics". – user43870 Jul 26 '20 at 9:01