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I found this shell by the sea of Galilee in 1967 and it makes a great door stop. I've not been able to identify it by searching the web. Can anyone tell me anything about it. It is solid iron, 17cm by 5.5cm and 2.77kg. The letter P is stamped on the base, which you you can see in the photo at 1:10 o'clock. There are no other markings. From searching the web I would say it might date anywhere from 1850 to 1940.

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    Might be worth looking at the British 6-pdr AT gun shells if can find some. It was in Israeli service after WW2. If not that then something of a similar size and vintage. – KillingTime Sep 9 '20 at 17:49
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    Could you recheck the diameter, perhaps with a tailor's tape? 5.7cm would indicate a six-pounder. – Schwern Sep 9 '20 at 17:54
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    @Schwern I'm assuming that the 5.5cm given in the question is the approx diameter. Looks very similar to a 6 pdr AP shot with the brass driving band and ballistic cap missing. – KillingTime Sep 9 '20 at 17:56
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    @KillingTime Sure looks like it. Could also have never had a cap (Mks 1-7). Could also be a US M70. – Schwern Sep 9 '20 at 18:05
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    c = pi * d or d = c/pi or d = 18/3.14 or d = 5.7cm. The math checks out. – Schwern Sep 10 '20 at 13:48
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It matches the description of a US M70 57mm AP-T (Armor Piercing with Tracer) shot which has lost its rifling band.

The M70 AP Projectile is a solid shot of hardened steel with a cavity machined into the base to receive a tracer. The ogive is continued to a point, and has a radius of 3.14 inches. A waved or knurled recess 0.79 inch wide is machined into the shot 1.01 inches above the base to receive a copper rotating band. A cannelure for receiving the crimps from the cartridge case is located 0.51 inch behind the rotating band.

The tracer charge consists of approximately 73 grains of red tracer composition in the form of 3 solid pellets and 20 grains of igniter charge in one pellet. The tracer charge is sealed into the tracer cavity with a clear celluloid cup cemented into place. The tracer burns for about 3 seconds.

It could also be a British 6 pounder (also 57mm) AP shot which has either lost its cap, or never had one in the first place (British Marks 1-7).

Both were used by the Ordnance QF 6-Pounder (and the nearly identical US 57mm M1) which was used by Israel.

Solid shot is safe to handle, but please take it to an expert to be sure.

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