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What's the primary theory behind tracks in the stone around the world? Even if they are ancient roads, why there are no traces from the horses or other animals that should be in the middle?

Turkey:

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Malta:

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Spain:

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North America:

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    What makes you think there should be a natural theory for this? Why would "traces from horses ... in the middle" survive for millennia? – gktscrk Sep 30 '20 at 19:29
  • @gktscrk the horses should create a depression in the middle just like tracks create the depressions on the sides. – Anixx Sep 30 '20 at 19:36
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    Dates and place would be helpful. So, (1) age of tracks vs use of wheel, and (2) age of tracks vs introduction of horseshoes, and (3) were the vehicles (wheeled or not) pulled by horses or people? – Jon Custer Sep 30 '20 at 19:52
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    I suspect it's probably geology in most of those cases, but I'd want to know more about the types of rock and other details. – sempaiscuba Sep 30 '20 at 21:47
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    100% of the time the wheels are on the ground. Horse hooves don't fall in the same place every time. The weight goes on the cart, not on the horse; the weight to surface area ratio is higher. Horses avoid ruts; carts seek them out. Erosion may play a role. – Mark C. Wallace Sep 30 '20 at 23:38
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I agree with @T.E.D., this may be a natural sciences question & it may be better suited to SE Earth Science. Many of the tracks look like erosion. This can be the result of a weakness in the rock due to a crack or other discontinuity experiencing water erosion.

Other causes could be the breakdown of the geology because of the weight bearing down on wheels, particularly steel rimmed wagon wheels. If the wheels continually follow within the same tracks over a prolonged period ruts will develop.

As to why animal tracks wouldn't be preserved, the weight of the animals would have been significantly less than the weight of the loads on the wheels of the wagons.

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    My high school had a stone floor outside the main dining hall, with a sharp "S" curve at one end, In most places the stone floors wore somewhat evenly across the full hallway width; but at that "S" turn, in a mere seven decades or so of use when I was there, the middle was worn a full inch and a half more than the sides from no more than a few hundred school boy feet rushing to dinner each day. – Pieter Geerkens Oct 1 '20 at 16:41

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