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I have a special interest on fables. By wandering on Gallica, I found out from the work of Joséphin Péladan: Textes choisis : pensées, théories, préceptes, fables et facéties / Léonard de Vinci that Da Vinci has actually wrote some fables. Out of curiosity, I wanted to find the original manuscript of the first fable I came across : La fiamma e la candela (see also Wikisource). Péladan indicated that it is sourced from C. A. 67, r. where C. A. stands for Codice Atlantico de l'Ambrossienne à Milan, 1891. I checked the folio 67, recto of the online project of Codex Atlanticus, but didn't find anything relevant as that page involves machine and artillery.

My question is: how could I find the original fable on the Codex Atlanticus manuscript ?

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An older source, the 1883 work Leonardo Da Vinci, (with translations) , on page 340 seems to indicate this as also being from Codex Atlanticus, but folios 66 and 201.

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These pages pg. 66, pg. 201 are mainly text at your online source, so may contain your original fable.

  • Thank you! Can we deduce that the folio numbering does not reflect the correct original order? (from the fact that (66a, 201a) and (66b, 201b) are paired in par. 1273 and 1274). Would it be surprising if the folio numbering changes over time? Or, it happens frequently? (Just curious if you have the answer). – Firmin Martin Nov 1 '20 at 16:29
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    Yes, the Codex is a collection of notebooks, some of which were ' dismembered some of Leonardo's notebooks in the formation of the codex, gathering the original leaves into 1,222 pages. ' Without attempting to translate the pages, it would be difficult to comment on weather or not 66 and 201 were originally in some order, or if the info was repeated in different original notebooks. – justCal Nov 1 '20 at 17:34

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