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There has been some discussion over how many people have died of starvation during The Great Depression, with the common consensus being that direct starvation killed very few, but the symptoms of chronic malnutrition (incl. worse immune system, disease caused by lack of vital vitamins...) could have been a significant contributory factor in many deaths.

And while this debate has been somewhat settled, it's still yet unclear to me how widespread malnutrition really was in the US populace at the time. Are there any statistical insights into this topic?

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    What has your preliminary research shown? What about sun livingnewdeal, or quora ? Do they answer? Justcal's comment is probably the best answer.
    – MCW
    Feb 19, 2022 at 0:23
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  • @justCal It's a duplicate, since OP limited it to the US.
    – Spencer
    Feb 20, 2022 at 0:06
  • It seems like a focus on the hunger and malnutrition portion of the question might be significantly different from the mortality issues discussed in the other questions answers. A proxy such as stunted growth rate or soup kitchen attendance might provide indicators, and perhaps other recent studies focusing on the malnutrition or hunger aspects might be found that were not discussed in the question on the mortality rates.
    – justCal
    Feb 20, 2022 at 1:17
  • For instance a paper here discussing malnutrition in the first half of the 20th Century might offer some insights.
    – justCal
    Feb 20, 2022 at 1:22

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