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I'm not sure this is the right place to ask, but we are trying to figure out the name of the artist and maybe even painting name that we saw in the Albertina in Wien.

It was most probably part of either the Batliner collection or the Huber collection.

It is a black and white piece depicting a city in winter with the snow melting off the roofs and roads and the city is Kitzbühel.

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    I'm not entirely convinced that this can be answered by historical sources and methods; I'm not sure that it can be answered with the information provided. Have you checked the catalog of the relevant collections? Batliner Huber
    – MCW
    Jul 6 at 11:44

1 Answer 1

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The description is quite vague.

But the info given seems to point to Alfons Walde:

Walde is known best for his winter landscapes and farming images, especially skiing and sporting scenes, painted in tempera or impastoed oil paint. Many of his paintings can be seen in the Museum gallery in Kitzbühel.

A recent catalogue with some examples: PDF

He painted for example a 'matching in name' one called "Kitzbühel im Tauschnee" (Kitzbühel in melting/thawing snow):

enter image description here (click to enlarge images)

Given that the 'painting' is described in the question as a "black and white piece", maybe you saw either a drawing or a different version of that painting?

At least, that image (that is the painter, painting of that name, with that motif) is found within the collection of the Albertina (but not visible online):

Stadt im Tauschnee (Kitzbühel), Künstler_in: Alfons Walde (Oberndorf 1891 - 1958 Kitzbühel), Datierung: 1919–1920, Technik: Öl, Tempera auf Leinwand, Stifter_in / Leihgeber_in: Dauerleihgabe von Dipl. Ing. ETH Christian Holzmeister, Inventarnummer: GE588DL Permalink: https://sammlungenonline.albertina.at/?query=search=/record/objectnumbersearch=[GE588DL]&showtype=record https://sammlungenonline.albertina.at/#/query/58c3eea3-0441-4829-a5cd-af4f7e988166

Another version by the same painter, matching but slightly different title ("City in melting/thawing snow"), but clearly still/again definitely Kitzbühel and 'somewhat more black&white', looks more like this:

enter image description here

Melting Snow in the City “Stadt im Tauschnee”, about 1919/20, Tempera on Paper, 27,95 x 31,89 in (71 x 81 cm), Wien, Österreichische Galerie Belvedere

Source: AlfonsWalde.com: City & Town Themes

But beware the colour reproduction of web images: enter image description here

Colours which tend to differ a bit between versions, example, example, extreme example.

On flickr we see the following version exhibited:

enter image description here

— Alfons Walde: "Stadt im Tauschnee" (Kitzbühel) 1919–1920.
Photo taken in Vienna, on 2018:12:07 20:27:53, by flickr user "neppanen" at the location tagged "Belvedere"

The Belvedere Museum, Vienna, lists online nine objects by Walde.

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    This definitely seems like the correct author. Even given the fact kitzbuhel is likely to look similar when different people draw it. Th painting we saw certainly wasnt a drawing or a sketch though. The black and white motif was intentional. The painting was part of the blau reiter/ die Brucke timeframe. I will add this information to the question. Though your answer might be pretty much spot on really. Or at least as good as can be expected unless I get lucky and someone who lives in Wien shows up.:)
    – DRF
    Jul 6 at 12:41
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    Ahh in the meantime yoh added the name which is definitely the right picture. Thank you very much I have no Idea how you managed to find it. I went through all the Albertina website I cpuld manage to find. Great job and thank you very much.
    – DRF
    Jul 6 at 12:42
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    Thank you again. The last picture you added is extremely similar to what we saw, including the name being the same. I just wanted to say how incredible this site is and your answer, since instead of being just able to learn the name of the picture, I got to find out a lot more about the author including the fact that far from this being a single painting of the city, it was one of many similar pictures that explored the same theme. So again thank you not just for the name and author, but also for all the extra information I gained from your answer.
    – DRF
    Jul 7 at 8:40

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