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In what respect could Italian Renaissance be considered a phase of romanticism?

It is stated in this quotation that Italian Renaissance is a phase of romanticism:

It is arguable that the Romantics have had 4 major phases of expansion and flowering. The first was coincident with the Reformation and included the Italian artistic Renaissance - even though that was still mainly working with religious forms.

from http://www.homeoint.org/morrell/misc/hippies.htm

But I never heard that. To me, romanticism starts in Germany as a reaction to the Enlightenment, and I have pretty no idea how the two movements have any similarity, not to mentioned that they are continuous of one another.

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    The period typically called Romantic varies greatly between different countries and different artistic media or areas of thought. Nowhere in the linked wiki article section does it mention a Renaissance period start however
    – justCal
    Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 13:50
  • @MCW I don’t really see in what respect my question is opinion based. Thank you for providing many ways to correct my question, but the alternative questions proposed do not cover what I am asking here. I need to know if Italian Renaissance can be considered a phase of romanticism. I believe this can be tackled with historical methods and sources.
    – Starckman
    Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 13:52
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    To say "It is arguable that..." is not to say "It is an irrefutable fact that..." It is rather, to say "Humor me in temporarily pretending that..." Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 14:10
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    Words don't have absolute meanings, English terms even less so. Thus asking what a term "could .. be considered" to mean is yes a solicitation of opinion. We can work with those sometimes, but it usually requires a topic that professionals have written about, so answers can just survey their opinions. This seems to me like a question for which that might be the case.
    – T.E.D.
    Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 14:37
  • From a language viewpoint renaissance means rebirth, from the French. It refers to the rebirth of classical culture after the era in between the fall of the western Roman Empire and the rebirth. That era in between being the "middle" ages. So a rebirth of classical culture, in large part meaning the old Roman Empire is literally a Romantic movement. You can argue whether that fits in with the later Romanticists but from a language point of view it does. Commented Feb 22, 2023 at 10:17

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First of all, let's discuss of what is "true" and how is defined.

From scientific point of view, the truth is defined by consensus of scientific community, so, until many sources (and documented ones!) agree on some definition, is not one single article the source of truth.

Authoritative sources (such as Wikipedia) clearly define the Renaissance period from 14th to 16th century, while the Romantic period at the end of the 18th century.

Second one, lets' read the text you quoted.

Right at the beginning of the text it says:

This is in some ways similar to the early Romantics. In both cases I also think they are definite 'reactions' to a rising dominant culture --Enlightenment then or scientific materialism now --which the Romantics stoutly reject as disturbing, unpleasant or inhumane.

Reading that, from the author point of view, it seems that Romantics (and early Romantic) is after Enlightment (17th to 18th century)

In the rest of the article the author only cite the correlation in one place (without any reference) as you have quoted:

It is arguable that the Romantics have had 4 major phases of expansion and flowering. The first was coincident with the Reformation and included the Italian artistic Renaissance - even though that was still mainly working with religious forms.

So, it contradicts himself (between the beginning and the quoted paragraph).

Given those two consideration, the answer to your question is:

Italian Renaissance can not be considered a phase of Romanticism

If - instead - we consider if the romantics have been inspired by their predecessor, and specially Italy's Renaissance, the answer is absolutely yes, and it is documented (as much as any other period takes from the predecessor).

On a personal note, by the article you quoted, we can see the Medieval Period as much Romantics as the Renaissance Period (take the "Roman de la Rose" as example)

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  • I think you need to say directly that the author is only drawing an analogy.
    – Spencer
    Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 17:36
  • @Spencer I guess you're right, but I can't be sure about the intentions of the author, he may be sincerely believe in what he write
    – Dan M
    Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 17:49
  • Thank you very much. I read the phd dissertation abstract you refer to. But in which aspects the Italian Renaissance already bears romanticism is not very explicit. Could you recall which features of the Italian Renaissance, which are significant of this movement, are romanticist?
    – Starckman
    Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 23:50
  • @Starckman you may read the whole thesis here: theses.gla.ac.uk/2680/1/2011mccuephd.pdf, I may try to do a synthesis, even if I believe that nothing like the original (215) pages of the author can better explain
    – Dan M
    Commented Feb 22, 2023 at 10:10

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