Skip to main content

Questions tagged [construction]

Questions regarding the history of constructing any type of installations or infrastructure.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5 votes
1 answer
368 views

How did medieval architects determine sizes and numbers of pillars, buttresses etc?

While looking at some magnificent gothic cathedrals, I began to wonder how these buildings were designed. (I hope that this site it the right place to ask, rather than the engineering one?) For ...
Toffomat's user avatar
  • 275
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is there evidence of a pagan temple on the site of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem that predated the Jewish Temple?

Is there any evidence of a pagan temple having preceded Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem on that same site? I have seen this argument made, but I wanted to know more about the reasons behind this ...
Reb Chaim HaQoton's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
113 views

When did swamp/wetland conversion first begin, and what were the early methods for doing so?

I have been trying to do some research into the early history of humans using wetlands, but haven't had much luck. As I understand it so far, there are a number of methods of "wetland conversion&...
RothX's user avatar
  • 153
5 votes
3 answers
183 views

When a wattle-and-daub construction was demolished, how did they recycle or dispose of the materials?

In the medieval age, when a wattle-and-daub building had to be demolished, did they recycle the materials? Especially the logs of the frames, these seem to be prime targets for reuse. This article ...
Mindwin Remember Monica's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
161 views

What are some examples that show medieval stone construction on top of older foundations?

Are there any more blatant examples that show new construction or repairs on older construction? Buildings like castles or walls With visible differences between the two construction eras? For example ...
aah123's user avatar
  • 71
17 votes
1 answer
5k views

What is the purpose of the iron structures seen on the sides of many WW2 flak towers?

I was researching World War 2 flak towers, and was unable to find the purpose of these iron(?) structures seen underneath the main walkway of many flak towers. My first thought was that it would ...
DKoontz's user avatar
  • 273
3 votes
3 answers
6k views

Why was 6 WTC not included in the plans to rebuild the World Trade Center?

In reading the Wikipedia article about the new World Trade Center, 6 WTC is conspicuously absent. It doesn't show up in the navigation sidebar: And there's no mention of it in the list of planned or ...
user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
265 views

Along side Roman roads, where did the drainage ditches lead? [closed]

Reading about how Roman roads were built, it seems they built drainage ditches on both sides. I've found various sites talking about this, such as this one. This leads to a question that will sound ...
DrZ214's user avatar
  • 17.2k
12 votes
3 answers
2k views

When during their construction did Bible-era Jewish temples become "holy"?

As is well documented in the Bible and elsewhere, in Bible times, the innermost area of a temple (often referred to as the Holy of Holies) was only permitted to be occupied by the head priest, and ...
Milwrdfan's user avatar
  • 239
2 votes
0 answers
209 views

Do we know how much the Aurelian Wall would have cost to build?

I've been reading about the Aurelian Wall and it's very fascinating, though I wonder how much, in denarii, sestercii, or other, it would have cost the Romans. Is there any way we could possibly ...
Lgndry's user avatar
  • 645
25 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why didn't pre-Norman English kings build stone town walls?

This question is about defensive city walls, not longer walls such as the Great Wall of China or Hadrian's wall. After the Norman conquest, many defensive city walls were built by Norman kings in ...
Apoorv's user avatar
  • 2,942
0 votes
0 answers
117 views

Are there examples of African/European/American hunter-gatherer's constructions?

Often people think about hunter-gatherers as primitives. "Dark Emu" book is a great example of popular history book that refutes those beliefs. Aboriginal constructions could be quite ...
Vashu's user avatar
  • 331
1 vote
0 answers
305 views

What was the purpose of rounded sills in Medieval castles?

At the Saranta Kolones Castle, or Forty Columns Castle, in Paphos, Cyprus, there are several door (gate?) sills which are rounded in the direction of travel, i.e. the edges of the sill that are ...
gktscrk's user avatar
  • 10.8k
6 votes
0 answers
96 views

What specific Medieval Rus waterway engineering examples are there?

I've been investigating a statement (cited below) made in Nicolle's 'Lake Peipus 1242' which describes waterway engineering by Medieval Russian princes but doesn't bring any specific examples. Which ...
gktscrk's user avatar
  • 10.8k
0 votes
1 answer
252 views

Are there other examples of naval bases being deliberately situated in shallow-water harbours post-1801?

The generic tendency in naval history has been that deeper ports are better as they allow larger ships to dock at the port. The importance of deeper water ports increased rapidly in the 19th century ...
gktscrk's user avatar
  • 10.8k
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

How was the first carpenter's square made?

A "square" is a tool, typically L or triangle shaped, that gives a craftsperson a quick and accurate 90° angle to use as a baseline in many important trades. It's easy to find a right angle if you ...
Pink Sweetener's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
267 views

Why did the UK use hewn stone cubes for homes far more often than France?

Why did the UK use hewn stone cubes (ashlar masonry) for homes far more often than France in the previous centuries? It would be rare to find this kind of rustic stone (rubble masonry ) in the UK, ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
18 votes
2 answers
8k views

How long would it take to build 30 miles of Roman road?

Say there's a route of 30 miles length in need of a road. Assume ready availability of stone and lime and possibly other materials. Some gentle slopes, no particularly adverse terrain or flora/fauna. ...
Erics's user avatar
  • 283
58 votes
2 answers
19k views

Why does Japan use the same type of AC power outlet as the US?

Does it have something to do with the US taking part in aiding reconstruction of the country after WWII? I've tried googling around for an answer, but every site I find simply states the outlet style, ...
spacetyper's user avatar
  • 1,279
18 votes
7 answers
2k views

Why are most of the world's oldest buildings in Europe and not in the Fertile Crescent?

Looking at the list of the world's ten oldest surviving human constructed buildings, many are in Europe while the oldest building in what (with a generous interpretation of the concept) could be ...
d-b's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
2 answers
194 views

What are good predictors of the construction year of residential buildings? [closed]

I follow a suggestion from a question on meta stackexchange to ask about actual, physical architecture here. I hope that is acceptable. I am interested in the information and features which a ...
Scrox's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is a wheel older than a wall?

I caught a snippet from the president’s remarks. He was talking about the wheel and how it is older than the wall. Is there historical fact to back such a statement? Or the other way around?
Dr. Shmuel's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
426 views

When did *wooden* 'nails' (pegs) for clay roof tiles go out of fashion?

Judging by Google searches, wooden 'nails' for fixing roof tiles are definitely a thing of the past. However almost all the searches I have attempted (in an area I don't know my way around) have only ...
pnuts's user avatar
  • 333
2 votes
0 answers
493 views

Did New York skyscrapers construction workers take any industrial action over safety concerns?

This video talks about the construction of New York's skyscrapers such as the Chrysler Building and Empire State by the 'roughnecks', a specialized set of construction workers who worked high in the ...
gpavanb's user avatar
  • 121
25 votes
2 answers
6k views

What is the oldest road tunnel in the world?

At the Furlo Pass in the Apennines, the Via Flaminia passes through a tunnel built in 76 - 77 AD during the time of Emperor Vespasian, replacing an earlier tunnel. The tunnel built during the time of ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
437 views

Did the Romans use any other materials to reinforce their concrete?

I have been reading about Roman concrete (300BC-300AD) and how it has greater strength than current concrete mixtures. So far, my research has shown that they did not use re-bar in their structures. ...
ed.hank's user avatar
  • 6,647
2 votes
1 answer
217 views

How many people were needed to build a country house?

After visiting the Wimpole Estate in England, I'm wondering how many people would have been needed to make such a project viable. The country house on the site today started construction in 1640, ...
Simon Fraser's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
381 views

What was a cistern to the Babylonians?

I am working with Babylonian math and some word problems mention an object called a cistern. I looked this up and it seems it can be any tank of water. Some are cylindrical, others rectangular, and ...
MrBobby's user avatar
  • 193
1 vote
2 answers
947 views

Did anyone ever try to beat the Great Wall of China by digging secret tunnels under it?

I know the Great Wall was useful to defend against enemies on land, but is there any record that people ever tried to beat the Great Wall by digging tunnels under it? If not, why didn't it happen?
Gstestso's user avatar
  • 135
59 votes
9 answers
25k views

Why are so many metros underground? Isn't that more expensive than an elevated system?

Starting with the London Underground in 1863, why are so many metros/subways built underground (as opposed to en elevated metro)? This requires a lot of digging and excavation, which to me seems a lot ...
DrZ214's user avatar
  • 17.2k
31 votes
4 answers
14k views

Why does the Great Wall of China follow such a bendy route?

Why does the path of the Great Wall of China bend back and forth so much? Naïvely, it would have taken less material and guards to defend if it had taken a straighter path, so there must have been ...
BenRW's user avatar
  • 543
7 votes
1 answer
16k views

How were peasant houses constructed in medieval England?

What was the typical construction material and process for a house in medieval England? Specifically, for a typical farming serf, operating a few acres of land. This question is meant as a more-...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
267 views

Why were the Malinta Tunnels built?

I understand that their function was for munitions storage, but according to Wikipedia, the Army Corps of Engineers just up and started building the Manlinta Tunnels in 1922. What was happening in ...
Mikey's user avatar
  • 123
15 votes
7 answers
2k views

Has the U.S. Navy ever commissioned the building of a warship overseas?

Many foreign navies have commissioned foreign shipyards to build warships and submarines for them. Most recently, Russia purchased to amphibious dock landing ships from France (that sale is currently ...
Bruce James's user avatar
  • 5,114
8 votes
1 answer
389 views

How close did the French come to digging a canal across the Isthmus of Kra in the 1880s?

Ferdinand de Lesseps is known to history as the man who pushed through the construction of the Suez Canal in the 1860s. Later (from 1880 onward) he led an attempt to dig a canal through Panama, but ...
neubau's user avatar
  • 1,597
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

How much did Shah Jahan spend on Taj Mahal?

I have watched(on TV) that the spending on Taj Mahal was so huge that it brought misery to the kingdom. So how much did Shah Jahan actually spend?(in whichever monetary unit you think is appropriate)....
Registered User's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
3k views

Construction of the Great Cothon of Carthage

I'm fascinated by the Great Cothon of Carthage, but when I try to learn more about it online, there's surprisingly little information. Everyone has physical descriptions of the size and shape, but ...
Nerrolken's user avatar
  • 7,712
10 votes
1 answer
425 views

When did we begin using metal mesh platforms?

I am trying to find the first time we used metal meshes as platforms, like in the image above. I though that a good starting point would be to find the moment metal meshes were created. Unfortunately,...
Saturn's user avatar
  • 219
4 votes
2 answers
396 views

What does the forward "Bullnose" of a Bailey Bridge that is under construction look like?

I read an excellent book titled "First Across the Rhine: The 291st Engineer Combat Battalion in France, Belgium, and Germany". In it, they describe some of the many functions that are performed by a ...
Major Stackings's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
3k views

What kind of wood was the standard decking for aircraft carriers in World War 2?

I know that both Japan and the United States used wooden decks on their WWII Aircraft Carriers. Was there a specific, "ideal" standard type of wood that was utilized by either country? If so, what ...
Major Stackings's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
5k views

Did the British and the French build the Suez Canal?

How is it that British officials and French engineers were responsible for the completion of the Suez Canal in 1869? This was before Egypt became a protectorate of the British Empire in 1914.
Daniel's user avatar
  • 3,537
11 votes
3 answers
1k views

What is the origin of the English Ship Building Philosophy?

I was reading an article on the Vasa the ship built under command of King Gustav Adolf, the ship sank during its launch on August 10, 1628. Part if the article mentions that the ship was somehow ...
MichaelF's user avatar
  • 7,547
41 votes
10 answers
8k views

What is the oldest building in the world still in use?

What's the oldest building in the world that is still in use (i.e. used for something other than a tourist spot).
Opt's user avatar
  • 3,872
18 votes
3 answers
1k views

Why were the Normans such good builders?

The Normans are a bunch of Vikings that settled in northern France, and within a century they were Christians speaking French. By 1066 they had become very experienced at fighting wars between ...
none's user avatar
  • 5,572