Questions tagged [england]

For questions relating to the historic Kingdom of England prior to 1707, or the country of England within the modern United Kingdom that is one of Britain's Home Nations.

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60
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6answers
16k views

Was England called England in the days of King Arthur?

King Arthur is a legendary king who is said to have ruled Britain in the early days of post-Roman Britain. Now Thomas Malory's famous novel "La Morte D'Arthur" puts the following inscription on the ...
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0answers
86 views

Were there any surveys done in the middle ages of England and Wales for the areas not covered by the Domesday book?

The Wikipedia page on the Domesday Book (completed in 1086) states that the City of London, Winchester, Westmorland, Cumberland, Northumberland, the County Palatine of Durham and some other areas / ...
9
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3answers
2k views

Meaning and usage of “Child of State”?

I have recently been reading about the 1688 English Revolution, which put William and Mary on the throne, more specifically about William and Mary's roles in deposing her father. At least one book ...
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2answers
1k views

How did Tenures Abolition Act of 1660 change feudalism in England?

The Tenures Abolition Act of 1660, according to Wikipedia, "changed the nature of feudal land tenure in England". It: .. replaced various types of military and religious service tenants owed to the ...
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2answers
2k views

What was the reaction to English monarchs using the title “King of France”?

After the Hundred Years War (or "wars") the English had been wiped off France, but English monarchs kept using their official title "King of France". As I understand, this was to ...
6
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2answers
306 views

What unknown laws were mentioned in earlier Coronation Oaths of England?

In 1688, the English Parliament passed the Coronation Oath Act, establishing a new Coronation Oath for monarchs of England. This Coronation Oath, with some modifications, is still used in the United ...
-3
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1answer
586 views

What caused medieval England to be freer than other countries at the time?

I have read that medieval England was an outlier in terms of personal freedoms in the middle ages. Can this be reliably traced to the cultural influence of the Saxons, or the Normans, or anyone else? ...
16
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2answers
6k views

What are the “ancient liberties” of the City of London?

I recently learned that three clauses of the Magna Carta are still part of UK law — the liberties of the English Church, the privileges of the City of London, and the right to trial by jury. I think ...
3
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1answer
133 views

Did the chronicler William of Malmesbury write that William Adelin threatened to make Anglo-Saxons 'draw a plow like cattle' when he became king?

In the Bohn's Antiquarian Library 1847 edition of William of Malmesbury's 'Chronicle of the Kings of England', there is a footnote which says another translator (Brompton) wrote: 'Willelmus ...
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2answers
586 views

Please outline how Philip II gained Normandy from the Third Crusade

I saw a video which summarized this, but now I can't find anything close to it. I believe that Philip made some type of agreement with Richard Lionheart before they went on the Crusades. Phillip came ...
4
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1answer
413 views

Why did Henry I imprison his older brother and rival Robert for almost 30 years instead of having him killed?

Keeping relatives who were rivals locked up was often seen as too risky – even if these relatives didn’t manage to escape, they could easily become focal points for rebellion. The English Kings John, ...
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1answer
333 views

Eohric of East Anglia and the usage of lion heads on banners

I was reading a historical novel by Bernard Cornwell (The Pagan Lord), when I came to this: Eohric, who had been King of East Anglia before we killed him, had a lion on his banner and his animal ...
8
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2answers
3k views

What was the price of going from England to New England as a passenger in the 1600s?

Lots of places mention that traveling to New England was so expensive that many people became indentured servants to get across, but I couldn't find a place that actually says how expensive it was.
10
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1answer
247 views

Was the London Times available in 1861 in villages?

How much access to national news would a person living in an English village in 1861 have? When did The Times and The Telegraph start distributing nationally, not just to major towns?
9
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1answer
499 views

How much knowledge of the past was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries?

Apart from the buildings themselves, what items of particular historical value were lost during Henry VIII's reign? Wikipedia's 'Dissolution of the Monasteries' makes some mention of libraries but ...
4
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1answer
2k views

How many illegitimate children did King Henry VIII have? [closed]

I am aware of Henry FitzRoy, his illegitimate son that he acknowledged whom he had with Bessie Blount. Are there any other confirmed illegitimate children?
6
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1answer
297 views

Jewish Money Lenders in England: What happened to Money Lendings after Expulsion?

When the Jews left England in 1290 by edict of Edward 1, who took over the role of Jews? My understanding is that the primary economic function was loaning money against future sales of farm produce --...
4
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2answers
179 views

An online old style Julian calendar for England?

The calendar (new style) act 1750 adopted the Gregorian calendar in England from 1752, and changed the start of the civil year from 25 March to 1 January. So, 1748-03-24 (old style) would have been ...
9
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3answers
1k views

What is a “Johnsonian world of clubs and coffee houses” in the context of 18th century England?

I was reading the biography of poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge by Richard Holmes and came across this line: [Coleridge had his] first unforgettable taste of the great talking-shop of London, the ...
4
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2answers
280 views

How did John Duns Scotus live in England during the Scottish Wars of Independence?

Apologies, this might be a very niche question, but I recently discovered that the theologian John Duns Scotus - a Scotsman, unsurprisingly - lived in England in the late 1200s/early 1300s - during ...
10
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2answers
2k views

How extensive was the slighting of castles in the English Civil War?

Wikipedia states During the English Civil War many castles and fortified houses were slighted by the Parliamentarians to stop them being used by the Royalists. Most of the destruction was in ...
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1answer
1k views

Was there a particular area of Victorian London in which bookshops were concentrated?

I see that there were many booksellers in Victorian London. Was there a particular area that hosted "respectable bookshops", in the manner that Petticoat Lane was a centre for Victorian clothing?
4
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3answers
20k views

Why is King Henry V regarded as such a great King?

In History magazine it says: King Henry V is well-known as a great man - charming, wooing, gracious, triumphant and an English hero. However, in a battle he ordered every male over 12 years old to ...
9
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1answer
368 views

Why does the parish register show more baptisms than burials?

The parish registers from Eversholt, Bedfordshire, are published for the period 1602-1812. They seem mostly complete. They contain records of 2074 burials, 2792 baptisms and 571 marriages. I can ...
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3answers
4k views

Why did baseball become more popular than cricket in the USA?

Recently I started reading a very interesting comic about high school baseball. I found that baseball shares so many similarities with Cricket. So I tried to look for some information regarding the ...
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7answers
3k views

How close were the living standards of India compared to England during the medieval period?

India, China and the African continent today are mostly associated with poverty in Europe, the US and so on. Looking at India specifically, did it during the medieval era share a similar standard of ...
2
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1answer
189 views

How many people were needed to build a country house?

After visiting the Wimpole Estate in England, I'm wondering how many people would have been needed to make such a project viable. The country house on the site today started construction in 1640, ...
9
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3answers
2k views

Why did Churchill accept the Order of the Garter in 1953?

Churchill had refused the Order of the Garter in 1945, quipping that he couldn't accept the garter from the king after the people gave him the boot. But in 1953 he relented and accepted the honour? Is ...
2
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1answer
188 views

How did wills work in times of Oscar Wilde?

Oscar Wilde's play The Importance of Being Earnest contains the following lines (shortened as marked for this purpose) in its third act: JACK. I beg your pardon for interrupting you, Lady Bracknell, ...
12
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1answer
470 views

Why were cobblers so radical?

Peter Ackroyd writes on page 88 of his account of the English Civil War: Cobblers were well known for their radical Protestant sympathies. What was so special about cobblers?
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2answers
742 views

How was 'the right to bear arms' understood in 17th-18th century England?

That the subjects which are Protestants may have arms for their defence suitable to their conditions and as allowed by law. This is from the Bill of Rights https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/...
6
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1answer
387 views

What evidence is there that Alfred paid the Danes to leave Wessex in 876?

The Danes struck at Wareham in 876. Alfred made peace there with Guthrum, and there was an exchange of hostages. However, the Danes broke the peace and during the night they killed the hostages and ...
2
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0answers
103 views

How big was the Puritan cohort in the Anglican church?

I'm mainly interested in the late Elizabethan and Jacobean periods. I've read church publications such as Church Society and AnglicansOnline,as well as all kinds of history websites and blogs, but I ...
7
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3answers
2k views

What English king died from water intoxication?

I vaguely remember reading a story about an English king that died from drinking too much water after a hunt. I'm sorry to say that all parts of this story may be untrue…I'm not sure whether it was a ...
5
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1answer
845 views

Why didn't the English overrun France when the king was their captive?

John II was captured after the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 and taken to Britain. Why did they wait and ransom him only to fight the French again? The ransom was 4 million pounds, but that could be ...
3
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0answers
349 views

Why isnt William of Orange considered to have conquered England? [closed]

I've always heard, colloquially, that the last successful invasion of England was in 1066. It seems to me that William of Orange, although the grandson of Charles I, was Dutch. It also seems like he ...
9
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1answer
325 views

Did Palmerston contribute to Louis Philippe's downfall?

I am reading this book and have come across a slightly puzzling passage on p. 154: [Palmerston] kept on good terms with Louis Philippe of France until he felt, in 1846, that Louis was taking an ...
1
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1answer
76 views

What procedures follow the resignation of a minister in the Westminster model? [closed]

What are the protocols or procedures that follow a public announcement by a minister of his intention to resign, in the Westminster model?
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0answers
74 views

Was there ever such a thing as a Court Tory?

Were all Tories part of the Country 'party'? Were some of them part of the court party? What was the distinction between Country and non-Country Tories, if there were any?
4
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2answers
415 views

In multimember constituencies of the House of Commons, how many votes did each voter have?

From the 1200s until the 1900s, seats in the Commons were elected in multimember -- primarily two-member -- constituencies. How many votes did enfranchised voters get in these elections? Did the ...
8
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1answer
230 views

What was the voting mechanism in early elections to the Commons?

From the 1200s in England, counties and towns sent two representatives to Parliament. Sheriffs ran the local elections, in which voters were enfranchised by being freeholders or potwallopers. ...
2
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0answers
175 views

Did Queen Victoria become more flexible during later years? [closed]

I came across a English exam practice question that basically says Queen Victoria was initially very stubborn but became more flexible during her later years (on formal matters such as the state, ...
1
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1answer
236 views

What Were the Primary Causes of 15th to 19th Century British Chartered Companies' Failures?

A Wikipedia list suggests that the earliest deemed English chartered trade monopoly organization was The Company of Merchant Adventurers of London in 1407 and presumably most, if not nearly all, ...
3
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0answers
598 views

How was the conflict between Henry II of England and Thomas Becket affected by the Concordat of Worms?

In my limited reading about Henry II of England and his conflict with Thomas Becket, I don't remember learning about Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. Is there any evidence that Henry II of England or ...
13
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1answer
2k views

What was a “searcher” associated with a funeral in 1690?

Life In A Noble Household 1641-1700 by Gladys Scott-Thomson, 1937, analyses the household accounts of William Russell, 1st Duke of Bedford. On page 236 is listed an entry from December 1690 where the ...
5
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2answers
1k views

What is a knight of the windmill?

In Thomas Paine's The American Crisis, while ridiculing Sir William Howe and his recently obtained knighthood, said: As a proper preliminary towards the arrangement of your funeral honors, we ...
1
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1answer
188 views

In 1700-1900 England, how were 'manners an end in themselves and not merely a means to achieve propriety by conformity'?

What does 1 mean: 'manners were [...] by conformity'? I know little about English history. How does 1 justify or mitigate 2; because to Anglophones in 2016, 1700-1900 English (e.g. Sheridan's opening ...
3
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2answers
514 views

How did the French and English forces “stack up” toward the end of the Hundred Years' War?

I am of the opinion that Joan of Arc, an "amateur" general, started France on the road to winning the war because she understood something that the "professionals" did not; that is, that the French ...
11
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2answers
1k views

What were the Government Press Prosecutions of 1858 and why did they occur?

In the second chapter of On Liberty, John Stuart Mill mentions in a note the "Government Press Prosecutions of 1858". He further writes that "The offence charged was not that of criticising ...
7
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5answers
675 views

Non Altered European Castles

I recently paid a visit to Leed's castle, and was disappointed by the extent to which the manor had been refurbished and modernized. Importantly: What castles in Europe are accessible to the public ...

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