Questions tagged [naval]

Of or pertaining to ships and or the sea, especially military vessels.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
0 answers
105 views

A vexillological question about about the use of maritime white flags in the 17th Century

Prior to (or contemporaneous with) Hugo Grotius' 1625 work in De jure belli ac pacis, what other flags of truce, surrender, or neutrality (if any) were typically raised by, or recognised by, European ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
368 views

Why did water stored on premodern ships "go brackish" or "go bad" while at sea?

I have read in several Napoleonic historical fiction novels that water stored on ships would somehow spoil over time. The water is described as completely unpalatable if not undrinkable, and alcohol (...
user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
230 views

Can anyone help identify the name of the white vessel in this photo w/the masts and funnel?

Unidentified White hulled vessel, possibly in the Boston area in the 1940s. The harbor tug is named IWANA and it was in service in Boston up until 1942. What is the name of the mystery white vessel? I’...
user avatar
  • 182
9 votes
5 answers
2k views

What other ships were with USS Saratoga when it was hit by a torpedo on 1942 Jan 11?

USS Saratoga (CV-3) was a Lexington-class Carrier of the USN. On 1942 Jan 11 it was hit by a torpedo from the Japanese submarine I-6, and then went in for repairs. However, I would like to know what ...
user avatar
  • 16.5k
18 votes
1 answer
6k views

What German torpedo problem was discovered in 1942?

I am reading a book about Otto Kretschmer, and the author speaks about a problem of German torpedoes. The only thing said in the book is: Torpedoes needed to be ventilated during some time because ...
user avatar
  • 5,192
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

When did the Royal Navy start to fill a given rank of admiral with more than one officer?

Admirals in the Royal Navy used to follow the coloured-squadron system. If I have understood correctly, when this practice first arose in the seventeenth century, there really were precisely nine ...
user avatar
  • 705
4 votes
1 answer
306 views

What were the capabilities of U-boats during the battle of the Atlantic?

I'm learning about the capabilities of German u-boats during the Battle of the Atlantic and their improvements during the war, in the most general sense. I researched three types of U-boat, the VIIA, ...
user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
409 views

Why was the Vichy French Navy in Toulon scuttled in 1942?

In the November 27 episode of the video series WW2 week-by-week I learned (around minute 18) that Admiral Jean de Laborde, Commander of the Vichy French fleet in Toulon, ordered it scuttled when he ...
user avatar
  • 1,052
1 vote
1 answer
247 views

Why did ships like the HMS Victory have cannon wells? [closed]

Is there a reason for ships of the line having a well deck/cannon well? (The part of the last closed line of cannons that is exposed just like the weather deck but is therefore lower than the weather ...
user avatar
-4 votes
2 answers
457 views

Why didn't the Allies use a naval invasion to retake Norway?

Norway was captured by Germany during WWII, and been liberated from Germany after Karl Dönitz signed the surrender treaty with the Allies. But there were some chances for Allies to create an assistant ...
user avatar
  • 117
5 votes
3 answers
282 views

In WW2 USN ships, what was the weight of a typical boiler?

I've been searching for this for days, but cannot find it. What is the weight of a typical boiler on a WW2 US Navy ship? Example: Fletcher Class DD had a total weight (displacement) 2100 to 2500 tons ...
user avatar
  • 16.5k
4 votes
1 answer
271 views

Why did the Ballahoo and Cuckoo-class schooners earn a bad reputation?

The Ballahoo and Cuckoo-class schooners were small (50-60 foot length) warships built for the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic wars. According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballahoo-class_schooner ...
user avatar
  • 2,331
3 votes
1 answer
262 views

Can anyone identify this European ?naval uniform from photograph and likely date (belle époque)?)

Possibly late 1800s, early 1900s. Almost certainly from the UK. Epaulettes may indicate Naval?
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
358 views

Did a submarine ever torpedo and sink a destroyer? [closed]

The naval battle of U-405 versus USS Borie sank the Borie, but that was due to its own action of ramming U-405, which had a stronger hull to withstand depth pressures. Did a submarine ever sink a ...
user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
2 answers
279 views

What ship is this in Sasebo, Japan Harbor, Korean War Era?

Identification of Ship in Sasebo, Japan Harbor, Korean War Era from my Flickr page https://www.flickr.com/photos/photolibrarian/51241341355/in/dateposted-public/
user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
502 views

Would the gun crews have different responsibilities aboard a 17th century ship than on the USS Constitution?

This video shows a simulated gun drill (the process of loading and firing the gun) performed by the crew of the USS Constitution. I believe the video depicts loading of black powder and the use of a ...
user avatar
  • 197
19 votes
2 answers
5k views

Was a bomb or shell ever dropped directly down the funnel of a warship?

I was surprised to learn in this awesome video about the USS New Jersey that the funnel on an Iowa-class battleship is not a straight line, there's a bit of a zig-zag in it. The idea was that, unlike ...
user avatar
  • 1,918
23 votes
3 answers
7k views

What was the "Favorable result" that the German admiralty was expecting from the naval attack on the Royal Navy in 1918?

The infamous order from 24th October 1918 was planning to slam the German High Seas Fleet against the British Royal Navy. If I recall correctly, this was the second time Germany tried to even the odds ...
user avatar
  • 3,118
1 vote
1 answer
226 views

Would a commissioned officer in the Royal Navy during the mid-late 18th century ever sail on a vessel other than a man-o-war, ship of the line, etc?

As someone who does not exactly understand how naval commissions worked in the 18th century, I am curious to know if there might have ever been an occasion where a commissioned officer (such as a ...
user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
204 views

How did changes in the balance of land versus naval balance of power prevent England from being successfully invaded by foreign powers after 1066?

The last successful invasion of England was that by the Normans in 1066. Prior to that, England had been successfully invaded by waves of Angles, Saxons, and Jutes from the Continent, and before that, ...
user avatar
  • 103k
2 votes
1 answer
170 views

Where was the Turkish Navy based in July 1914?

I'm trying to figure out whether, if not for the July crisis, Russia could have tried an amphibious invasion of Turkey in 1914, and what the outcome would have been if so. It seems to me the answer ...
user avatar
  • 2,331
4 votes
0 answers
155 views

Was there an official order on ships' cats per vessel?

In the funny, but still (I assume) historically accurate material about "The history of Ships Cats", the author states that "many navies had standing order for minimum acceptable number ...
user avatar
  • 3,118
4 votes
1 answer
414 views

What was the fastest coal-powered ship in a country's navy?

The transition from coal to oil fuel as the primary energy source for navy ships took place leading up to and during WWI. The last British battleship to primarily use coal power was the Iron Duke ...
user avatar
  • 143
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why was the ship "Palmyra" so named?

On November 7, 1802, the american trading ship Palmyra, under Captain Cornelius Sawle, was shipwrecked on the reef, which took the vessel's name and now is known as Palmyra Atoll. Does anybody know ...
user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
453 views

Is the use of flamethrower style naval weapons depicted in this game accurate?

In the popular strategy game Age of Empires 2, one key naval unit is the so-called Fire Ship. Fire ships in the game use a siphon to launch a continuous stream of fire projectiles on the enemy. ...
user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
677 views

What type of warship is this (likely WW2)?

I know it's not much to go on, but can anyone identify the type of vessel in the photo? Being officers, there is no cap tally for me to try and zoom in on.
user avatar
  • 59
6 votes
3 answers
362 views

How common was capturing a post-sail warship?

From this answer it appears that capturing an enemy warship in battle, either by boarding, or by shooting at them from bow or stern until they surrender, was relatively common in the age of sail. ...
user avatar
  • 25.6k
29 votes
4 answers
6k views

How difficult was to escape from a naval battle after engaging into one during the Age of Sail?

So, I am designing a board game which includes pirates/imperial battles during the age of sail. While I have found a lot of information on the internet as well as books, papers and of course other ...
user avatar
  • 391
2 votes
0 answers
138 views

Has a prize ship ever been surrendered to a neutral country?

According to the Hague Peace Convention of 1907, §13 Art. 3, whenever a belligerent power captures a prize ship in the territorial waters of a neutral power, the belligerent power must surrender the ...
user avatar
  • 2,460
36 votes
2 answers
6k views

Has there been a naval battle where a boarding attempt backfired?

In the War of 1812 battle between the USS Chesapeake and HMS Shannon, the Shannon outgunned the Chesapeake decisively, then closed to board the enemy ship. Hand-to-hand fighting ensued before the USS ...
user avatar
  • 5,500
3 votes
3 answers
455 views

Were the Japanese "Kongo" class battlewagons advanced for their time?

Built in the early 1910s, Japan's Kongo class battlecruisers had eight 14-inch guns, a speed of about 30 knots, and a displacement of about 26,000 tons. This gave them advantages over British ...
user avatar
  • 103k
5 votes
1 answer
301 views

Did the French violate the Washington Naval ConferenceTreaty limitations?

I was surprised to read in connection with Mers el Kebir that in 1940, France had the second largest navy in Europe, with seven battleships. The reason was France's participation in the 1922 ...
user avatar
  • 103k
4 votes
2 answers
368 views

Why were Japanese escort ships not numerous at the battle of Bismarck Sea?

During the battle of Bismarck sea, Allied units performed air attacks that resulted in the nearly destruction of Japanese fleet. I understand the reasons why the Allies obtain such a success, namely: ...
user avatar
  • 5,192
2 votes
0 answers
178 views

Has it ever been practice to clip to ratlines?

I am reading a story (alt history) where it describes climbing on a ship with the sailors: pausing to clip their safety harnesses to the ratlines every few feet. Now, I used to work on a tallship, ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
223 views

Can you identify this Empire flagged c1913 single stack ocean liner?

I believe my great-grandparents arrived on this ship in 1913. I cannot find the name of the ship. The family immigrated to Canada in 1913 from Belgium. They may have arrived in Quebec, or Saint John, ...
user avatar
  • 11
9 votes
2 answers
3k views

If a merchant ship captain joined the Royal Navy during the age of sail, would they be put in command?

If the captain/former captain of a merchant ship joined the navy or was press ganged into the the navy would they be put in command of a ship or would they have to work they way up through the ranks? ...
user avatar
  • 109
8 votes
1 answer
255 views

Did any of the Flying Tigers lead a US Navy squadron?

I came across a couple of passages on the Flying Tigers, mercenary armies and famous volunteers I saw how one pilot became an ace in Europe and another became a General in the 10th Air Force after ...
user avatar
  • 83
1 vote
1 answer
286 views

What were common crew ranks on US Navy flying boats and bombers?

historians! I asked this question over on the Aviation SE, but was also suggested to ask here. Below is a copy of my question from over there. I have been trying to figure this out for some time, but ...
user avatar
  • 163
9 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why did the US Navy and Marine Corps use satanic symbolism in WW2?

When you look at certain names and symbols used by the U.S. Navy (USN) and the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) during WW2, you could see they are heavily loaded with satanic symbols. You have the F6F Hellcat ...
user avatar
  • 10.9k
1 vote
0 answers
100 views

How many times has inclement weather foiled attempts to navally invade the UK? [closed]

Inclusive of situations where inclement or unseasonable weather delayed the ability to set sail long enough that British ships/fleets were able to foil the plan by direct actions, how many times has ...
user avatar
  • 111
11 votes
1 answer
1k views

When was the first intentional ricochet fired from a naval artillery?

Wikipedia states that the first ricochet firing was performed in 1688. This other website says it may have existed in 1587. All those historical events are for cannonballs fired from the ground ...
user avatar
  • 717
3 votes
0 answers
180 views

Which Soviet submarine was HMS Splendid tracking on 30th March 1982?

In 'Vulcan 607', R. White describes the background of the submarines that headed to the Falkland Islands. For the HMS Splendid, he notes that the submarine, under CO Lane-Nott was engaged in a mission ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
2 votes
1 answer
256 views

How were ship kills accounted in WWII?

In the movie Greyhound, at the end, the fleet requests an oral report of the incidents in which the captain says "My escort group sank three others...". But in the movie it is seen that ...
user avatar
  • 123
2 votes
1 answer
119 views

How much protection did Fort Warren afford Boston?

Fort Warren (constructed 1833–1861) was built on Georges Island in Boston Harbor, by my understanding to guard what was then the main channel into Boston, marked "Main Shipping Channel" on ...
user avatar
  • 403
2 votes
0 answers
77 views

Where from, and in what way, did the first detailed account of the use of self-propelled torpedoes reach the RN and USN?

Three possible candidates seem to exist for the first verified (non-participant) observation of a torpedo boat assault. The options are the Russo-Turkish War, at Caldera Bay, or at Weihaiwei, all of ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
0 votes
1 answer
211 views

Are there other examples of naval bases being deliberately situated in shallow-water harbours post-1801?

The generic tendency in naval history has been that deeper ports are better as they allow larger ships to dock at the port. The importance of deeper water ports increased rapidly in the 19th century ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
4 votes
0 answers
126 views

Is there any evidence of naval ramming in the 9th and 10th century North Sea?

In Bernard Cornwell's 'Sword of the Kings', his main character uses the tactic of ramming to sink an enemy ship before engaging in hand-to-hand combat with surviving ships which get leashed together. ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
4 votes
0 answers
124 views

Did Spain have a strategic plan for its navy in the Spanish–American War?

Admiral Cervera y Topete is cited in many places as having thought that the Spanish couldn't defeat the Americans in war due to the dilapidated state of the Spanish Navy. The position of the Spanish ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
10 votes
2 answers
348 views

What did the Baltic Fleet do in Reval in 1904 and when was it there?

I noticed, in @Schwern's answer that the 1904-1905 journey of the Baltic Fleet is cited as having started in (modern Tallinn). This doesn't make much sense as to the best of my knowledge Reval/Tallinn ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
42 votes
3 answers
8k views

In the Battle of the Coral Sea, how could two Japanese scouts grossly mis-identify two American ships?

I've been reading the Wikipedia pages about the Pacific theatre in WW2; in the page describing the battle of the Coral Sea there is the following passage: [...] the scout [from Shōkaku] confirmed ...
user avatar
  • 731

1
2 3 4 5
7