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Questions tagged [physics]

For questions specific to the history of physics, the natural science studying general properties of matter, radiation and energy. General questions about mathematics are off-topic but might be asked on Physics Stack Exchange.

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1answer
72 views

Help finding paper by Jean Buridan

I'm trying to make a timeline of momentum for my physics class and I keep running across a paper by Jean Buridan called QM XII.9: 73ra. I don't know what any of this means, and I don't know how to ...
2
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1answer
234 views

After the Mongol Empire fell, did China really turn away from math and physics?

I came across this from the Wiki article on Chinese Mathematics: After the overthrow of the Yuan Dynasty, China became suspicious of knowledge it used. The Ming Dynasty turned away from math and ...
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2answers
194 views

Newton a plagiarist? [closed]

It is well-known that Hooke anticipated Newton's law of gravitation. Was this case grave enough such that Newton today would be called a plagiarist?
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1answer
5k views

Did Einstein really say this quote about time?

This quote is commonly attributed to Albert Einstein: The only reason for time is so that everything doesn't happen at once. However, there are many cases of quotes misattributed to Einstein. ...
19
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2answers
2k views

How could Eratosthenes measure the circumference of the Earth?

Some 2,200 years ago, Eratosthenes calculated the radius of the Earth. A brief recap Plant a stick in the ground vertically, and wait until the sun is directly above the stick, that is until ...
4
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2answers
414 views

Newton, Galileo, and Gravity

One of the few things I remember from my high school physics class is my teacher telling me that Newton discovered things like the universal law of gravitation simply because his initial premise was ...
2
votes
1answer
166 views

Is Maxwell really owner of Maxwell's Equations?

Maxwell's equations are four equations known to Maxwell; but it seems to me that they are GFAM's (Gauss-Faraday-Ampere-Maxwell's) Equations. Why are they then called only Maxwell's Equations!?
14
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3answers
750 views

How did the “Standard Model” physics theory get that name?

I want to know how the Standard Model theory got such "generic" name. (I've made this question in Physics StackExchange, but it was considered off-topic, and someone suggested to reask it here.)