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Yasskier
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What was the “Favorable result” that the German admiralty was expecting from the naval attack on the Royal Navy in 1918?

The infamous order from 24th October 1918 was planning to slam the German High Seas Fleet against the British Royal Navy. If I recall correctly, this was the second time Germany tried to even the odds at sea, but the failed Battle of Jutland showed that it was easier said than done.

However, the admiralty was optimistic that "this time we can do it". Admiral Scheer apparently wrote after the war:

"it was highly probable an expedition of the Fleet might achieve a favourable result. If the Fleet suffered losses, it was to be assumed that the enemy's injuries would be in proportion, and that we should still have sufficient forces to protect the U-boat campaign in the North Sea, which would have to be resumed if the negotiations should make imperative a continuation of the struggle with all the means at our disposal.1

However, the stakes were highly against Germany with a ratio of 2:1 (even 3:1 in case of smaller boats) enter image description here

Were conditions, crew training and technological advantages that Germany had sufficient for such an optimistic approach, or was it just more wishful thinking to win the war by attrition? Or was this attempt merely a way to get better conditions in the armistice?

1 Scheer, Germany's High Seas Fleet in the World War, Ch.18., 1919.

Yasskier
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