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pertaining to the American Revolutionary War (1775-1781) and its era, where the 13 North American colonies fought and won independence from Great Britain.

2
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Anthony Wayne is well described as "mad," but that is in "angry (arglich), not "crazy (Wahnsinn). He was a tough, demanding commander who was either loved or hated (more of the former than the latter) …
answered Aug 26 '17 by Tom Au
1
vote
Yes, many of them did. Specifically the third of four groups listed below. But that is not what finally won the war. There were actually four groups of American soldiers. The first group was the smal …
answered Aug 1 '16 by Tom Au
1
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Most of your exhibit is a "cover letter" for the circular. Then there are several pages that list the signatories. The "refuse" list at the end of the document is very short. It does not cover even a …
answered Aug 23 '17 by Tom Au
1
vote
General Howe had originally proposed to London to move north to support Burgoyne (and hopefully split off the four New England states and New York from the southern colonies). He thought better of thi …
answered Sep 26 '17 by Tom Au
6
votes
Armies would "march in formation while retreating" if not routed. Maintaining formation was all important in a retreat. Most casualties were caused by armies falling apart and individual men being "p …
answered Jun 9 '17 by Tom Au
3
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The Whigs were left of center, and their sympathies were basically pro-American. Their great leader, William Pitt the Elder opined, "If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop …
answered Mar 16 '15 by Tom Au
5
votes
One reason was that in the late 18th century, Britain was trying to define who was "British." And this, led in turn to the question of what a "colony" was and "how much" representation one should have …
answered May 18 '16 by Tom Au
2
votes
Yes, Libery Poles still exist today, although in a slightly different form. They were the precursor of what we now call flagpoles. Most flagpoles are now made of metal, rather than wood, and are the …
answered Aug 24 '17 by Tom Au
4
votes
The 17th century English civil wars fostered a spirit of rebellion in the American colonies. Which led to independence. Prior to the Civil War, Parliament tried to impose a check on the king through …
answered Dec 10 '13 by Tom Au
3
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The "London Enemies List" was a list of people connected to Revolutionary Paul Revere. It may have been a self-proclaimed list (e.g. through a club) or one compiled by Tories (possibly through "club" …
answered Aug 23 '17 by Tom Au
1
vote
One reason was that "guerrilla warfare" was largely replaced by trench warfare. The purpose of guerrilla warfare was to allow the weaker side (usually the defender) to "shoot and run" and hide, there …
answered Aug 4 '16 by Tom Au
0
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Independence was declared in July, 1776. That was a political act that basically superseded other days connected with the war and peace, such as October, 1781, or January, 1783. The main choice of da …
answered Jul 12 '17 by Tom Au
2
votes
Crispus Attucks was the oldest of the victims of the Boston Massacre. Born in 1723, he was the only member of the "Great Awakener" generation (of Jonathan Edwards and Benjamin Franklin), and a likely …
answered Nov 1 '16 by Tom Au
6
votes
The Loyalists supported the losing side during the American Revolution. That's because they represented only about 15% of the American population, versus 45% for the Revolutionaries. After the Declara …
answered Jan 11 '18 by Tom Au
2
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In Common Sense, Thomas Paine wrote, "there is something very absurd in supposing a continent to be perpetually governed by an island." The United States was a country of continental size, far away f …
answered Sep 6 '17 by Tom Au

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