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A form of government where sovereignty is contained in a single individual.

2
votes
A monarchy is often formed during a time of war, when a successful and popular general is crowned king. In the Bible, for instance, King Saul was anointed by the prophet Samuel as King of Israel …
answered Sep 19 '17 by Tom Au
12
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The person that best fits your description is Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria. Born in 1819, he would have been twelve years old in 1831, which would have made him a "juvenile." That was …
answered Sep 1 '17 by Tom Au
14
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There are two types of queens. A Queen Consort is the wife of a King. A Queen Regnant is a ruler in her own right, a "female king" of you will. The husband of a Queen Consort is just the King, per th …
answered Jun 6 '12 by Tom Au
6
votes
The Queen (or King) of England is a constitutional monarch, a ceremonial figure whose powers are strictly circumscribed by the constitutions of England (or other Commonwealth countries). In THEORY, t …
answered Jul 12 '12 by Tom Au
1
vote
King Louis VII was probably one such king. His first wife, Eleanor of Acquitaine (in)famously complained that he was "more of a monk than a man." When they got married (as teenagers), he donated her w …
answered Dec 21 '14 by Tom Au
0
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That's a bit like saying, why did no Prime Minister of England marry into the royal family to merge the two? It could happen of course, but it is not likely to, because of "jealousy" on both sides. L …
answered Dec 15 '14 by Tom Au
6
votes
Most nobles of the Middle Ages felt that they owed allegiance to TWO kings: 1) the king of their country, and 2) God, their heavenly king, for whom the Pope was the "viceroy" (vice-king) for Christian …
answered Oct 18 '13 by Tom Au
2
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Napoleon was crowned Emperor under the auspices of the Pope (Pius VII) in 1804, about 1000 years after Charlemagne. (Actually, he placed the crown on his own head after the Pope spoke his piece.) But …
answered Jan 18 '18 by Tom Au
3
votes
A simple answer is because of the lines of inheritance. In the 16th century, there was a rivalry between two queens, Mary Queen of Scots, and Queen Elizabeth I, who each wanted the throne of the othe …
answered Jan 20 '13 by Tom Au
14
votes
Most "bastards" were sired by their fathers with women of a lower rank than the fathers. Kings and princes would seldom have access to "princesses" (who were protected and treated like vestal virgins …
answered Apr 21 '17 by Tom Au
2
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The fact of the matter was that Franco did reestablish the monarchy, but only toward the end of his life. In 1947, Franco declared Spain a monarchy. At the time, his preferred Spanish heir to the …
answered Oct 8 '17 by Tom Au
3
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If your daughter is the mother of the monarch's children, that would inhibit most monarchs from attacking you. After all, you're the children's grandparent (and monarch's parent in law). And the monar …
answered Oct 5 '15 by Tom Au
1
vote
The brother Robert was not only "older" than Henry I, but also "old" (by the standards of the time, aged 55 or so when imprisoned). Killing "weak" people (such as oldsters) went against the code of ch …
answered Sep 13 '17 by Tom Au