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Results tagged with Search options user 1401

For questions spanning a significant proportion of the 20th century. Questions focused on the latter decades should consider using the contemporary-history tag. Individual tags exist for specific decades.

0
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The gold standard was a simple, straightforward way of managing the world's money supply. Like most simple, straightforward ideas, it is utterly inadquate when confronted with a complicated real world …
answered Oct 19 '13 by Mark C. Wallace
5
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Communism advocated worldwide revolution, and the abolishment of private property. That seems to be sufficient reason to oppose the movement. I can't answer whether that qualifies me as an extremist …
answered Dec 17 '12 by Mark C. Wallace
4
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James Moffett according to this letter from FDR. (sorry for my earlier erroneous answer).
answered Nov 27 '13 by Mark C. Wallace
2
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Foot Soldier of Birmingham (Actually most of Malcom Gladwell's podcast fits your requirements) - a statue in Birmingham that is widely believed to be evidence of racist oppression by whites, but the …
answered Jul 24 '18 by Mark C. Wallace
15
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The Smithsonian lists a couple of competitors including Samuel P. Langley, and Sir Hiram Maxim. Wikipedia has a reference to competing claims. Langley was paid by the government; he may be the ind …
answered Mar 28 '13 by Mark C. Wallace
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The answer to your question is unequivocally "No", since you clarify in your comments that you reject any policy solution that is imposed on society by a ruling class. I can't think of a single publi …
answered Jul 4 '18 by Mark C. Wallace
5
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I think his honors are described in the bio you cite. He spent 50 years in academia, and as the title states, The appellation "Dr Dr h.c.mult." shortens the Latin honoris causa multitudo - roughl …
answered Dec 10 '12 by Mark C. Wallace
6
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Mark Kozak-Holland argues that it was quite avoidable. Although popular history has it that the ship was designed to remain afloat with 4 compartments flooded (hat tip to @GWLlosa), the truth is some …
answered Dec 12 '12 by Mark C. Wallace
4
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December 2012 BBC History magazine contains an article that analyzes popular support for Benito Mussolini. In passing the article mentions a widespread perception on the part of Italians that liberal …
answered Dec 6 '12 by Mark C. Wallace
6
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Although Quayle is the punch lines of many jokes, he had served with distinction, and had been elected with significant margins; those are strong positives for a Vice Presidential Candidate. He w …
answered Feb 25 '13 by Mark C. Wallace
40
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Yes we have at least one account of cannibalism. First source: A teenage orphan kills and eats her four-year-old brother. Guardian Second source: I didn't know that there were thousands of …
answered Nov 17 '16 by Mark C. Wallace
6
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By January 1964, public opinion had started to change - 68% now supported a meaningful civil rights act. President Johnson signed the 1964 Civil Rights Act in July of that year. I'm not quite su …
answered Apr 28 '13 by Mark C. Wallace
1
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In 1916 the U.S. Army ordered up some Harleys with sidecars to help track down Pancho Villa in the deserts along the Mexican border, and Bill Harley developed machine-gun mounts for the sidecars. R …
answered Sep 8 '16 by Mark C. Wallace
3
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Wikipedia and Timeline provide a hint of the many discoveries that Bell Labs was working on during the breakup. A partial list of answers includes optical routers, signaling, lasers, HDTV, optical dig …
answered May 1 '13 by Mark C. Wallace
3
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According to Arnold Toynbee at least 50 percent [500,000 - 700,000] would be casualty of the deportations.[7] Wikipedia, which references Arnold Toynbee, "A Summary of Armenian History up to and …
answered Feb 13 '14 by Mark C. Wallace

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