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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 19407

Of or pertaining to ships and or the sea, especially military vessels.

3
votes
expensive, and its usefulness would be limited. It can only help one or two ships at a time, and many ships may be damaged in a battle. Also, naval vessels don't go around in groups of constant …
answered Feb 9 by John Dallman
2
votes
The usual method was to build a cairn of large stones, rather than a hut, and put written messages in watertight containers into it. This doesn't require transporting materials to build a hut to Antar …
answered Mar 10 '17 by John Dallman
7
votes
The Allies were fussy about the schedule for Normandy for a combination of reasons. They wanted a full moon to make night parachute drops easier, and a landing shortly after dawn with the tide half-wa …
answered Mar 6 '17 by John Dallman
2
votes
Ramming survived as a tactic for use against submarines much longer than for use against surface vessels. The reason for this is that submarines are fairly fragile, and any significant leakage makes t …
answered Dec 19 '16 by John Dallman
1
vote
Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922-46 has the amount of fuel carried and a range at a specified speed for most of the ships it covers, which is essentially every significant naval vessel … take time to arrange for. So naval bombardment was done when precise fire on short notice was required. …
answered Apr 14 by John Dallman
3
votes
The Deutschland was sent on a commerce raiding mission at the start of the war. However, she was not allowed to begin raiding until 26th September 1939, because Hitler hoped to make peace with Britain …
answered Oct 8 by John Dallman
2
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away from their ships. Edit: I have to admit my sources for this are tertiary, but the naval fiction of C S Forrester and Patrick O'Brien was very well-researched. …
answered Nov 22 '16 by John Dallman
0
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As other have said, the change became appreciated during WWII. An important prerequisite for the change was the advent of aircraft engines in the 1000hp class, which meant that single-engine aircraf …
answered May 28 '17 by John Dallman
1
vote
My best source for this is Richard B. Frank's book Guadalcanal, which doesn't mention Ghormley receiving the reports. However, requiring the reports to be routed through Ghormley to Turner would have …
answered Aug 15 '17 by John Dallman
19
votes
Ships have masts. The 5th Battle Squadron was made up of ships that had lookout ("gunnery spotting") positions high enough to cater for the ranges of the guns.
answered Jan 28 '17 by John Dallman