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Questions related to aspects of World War II (1939-1945 AD). An international conflict whose major participants were the fascist countries of Germany, Italy, and Japan engaged against the allied nations of the UK, France, China, the USSR, and the USA. The conflict began with the German invasion of Poland and formally ended with the American victory over Japan.

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To be clear, Red Orchestra was an umbrella term used by the Gestapo for anti-Nazi resistance movements in Berlin, and for Soviet espionage rings operating in German-occupied Europe and Switzerland dur …
answered Aug 19 '17 by sempaiscuba
98
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Although we know a great deal about the events surrounding Hitler's "Halt Order" at Dunkirk, the truth is that the reasons behind it are not completely understood by historians, even now. It is a mis …
answered Aug 31 '17 by sempaiscuba
9
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The details of the engagement were included in an after-action report submitted by the Commander of Task Force Fifty-Eight (which carried out the attacks) to the Commander in Chief of the United Stat …
answered Aug 4 '18 by sempaiscuba
13
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After the UK withdrawal, are there other Allied bases left from those that were originally meant to control the situation in Germany? Yes. There are a number of bases operated by the United Stat …
answered Jan 5 by sempaiscuba
35
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The definitive source you are looking for here would be the Royal Air Force Operations Record Books for the squadrons involved. There are two parts to RAF Operations Record Books. There is the ( …
answered Feb 25 by sempaiscuba
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TL; DR* The article is referring to all the German cities destroyed by the allied strategic bombing campaign. Those bombings were not indiscriminate, but targeted (within the limitations of the tech …
answered Sep 2 '18 by sempaiscuba
3
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It seems that the intention had been to build Fat Man devices for the planned subsequent missions even before the first Trinity test on 16 July 1945. I haven't been able to find online copies of mo …
answered Oct 28 '17 by sempaiscuba
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The idea of sending pilots on one-way suicide missions is largely attributed to a Capt. Motoharu Okamura. He is quoted as saying: In our present situation I firmly believe that the only way to swi …
answered May 6 '17 by sempaiscuba
3
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It is difficult to be certain without seeing a picture of that part of the discharge papers, but I suspect that it should actually read: Central Europe AG 200.6 and Rhineland AG 200.6 wher …
answered Oct 30 '18 by sempaiscuba
2
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United Kingdom The rules for compensation in the UK were set out in the Compensation (Defence) Act 1939. These covered requisitions of land, vessels, vehicles and aircraft, compensation in respect of …
answered Nov 25 '17 by sempaiscuba
16
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I suspect that it was political hyperbole intended to boost public support for his policy of appeasement, particularly if you consider the quote in full: “How horrible, fantastic, incredible it is …
answered Oct 8 '17 by sempaiscuba
4
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Given that the truck was a lend-lease vehicle sold in Queensland, I'd guess that it was supplied to Australia under the terms of the lend-lease agreement. Under the terms of the lend lease agreemen …
answered Oct 21 '17 by sempaiscuba
40
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The US Navy certainly had ocean-going tugs during the Second World War. One example you mentioned was the Navajo-class, or Cherokee-class ocean-going fleet tugs (ATF), another were the Abnaki-class f …
answered Feb 4 by sempaiscuba
9
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Firstly, there is nothing 'foolish' about it. Military planning is about contingencies. The Japanese listening stations had received a report, they forwarded that report using a code they believed t …
answered Apr 19 by sempaiscuba
6
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It seems unlikely. Additional crew on deck would risk a delay if a crash-dive were required. The need to keep crew on watch to a minimum is mentioned by Timothy Mulligan in his book Neither Sharks …
answered Nov 14 '17 by sempaiscuba

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