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Results tagged with Search options questions only user 332

Questions pertaining to characteristics of armed forces' structure, manpower, equipment, or expenditures.

6
votes
4answers
indicating the use of black powder for military purpose explosives as early as 12th century AD in China (as in, to blow stuff up instead of to propel something)? Are there no references to earlier use …
asked Nov 25 '11 by DVK
9
votes
4answers
desert (wood from trees). Is there an evidence that this was indeed a factor influencing the use of bow and arrows as military technology by tribes living in such conditions? If that's not the case …
asked Dec 8 '11 by DVK
14
votes
10answers
Is there a confirmed historic record of using "non-standard" live animals for military purposes? To clarify, the following doesn't count due to either being standard or non-military: "Standard … despite not ever being used as military mounts outside their habitat. Animals typically used for non-military food/supplies included for similar logistical purposes. Animals used for purposes identical …
asked Nov 23 '11 by DVK
18
votes
3answers
-culture bows and arrows for military purposes? I'm explicitly excluding bow types that were specifically designed for armor penetration (14th century English longbow, crossbow etc...). I'm OK with the … answers being culture specific - e.g. I would naively expect Mongolian bows to be dual purposed. But a great answer would have more generalized analysis and overview. I am especially interested in cultures whose military opponents weren't heavily armoured. …
asked Dec 16 '11 by DVK
14
votes
1answer
have presumably lived/farmed in the area since (but NOT built habitats), the reasons for lack of more finds that are usually given are the cost of metal military equipment at the time (meaning great …
asked Dec 12 '11 by DVK
22
votes
3answers
Mongols of Khan's time are generally considered to be a cavalry army, which makes sense logistically, given the width and speed of their military maneuvers. But is there historical evidence of … /primarily fight dismounted, using infantry tactics). I'm only including front line soldiers - e.g. auxiliary engineering, logistics, and whatever equivalent of military police/garrison troops inside …
asked Dec 30 '12 by DVK
25
votes
6answers
Historically, armies usually had a balance between warriors with projectile weapons (bows/guns) and close combat edged weapons (sword/pike/axe etc...). This was necessary because ranged weapons of t …
asked Dec 19 '11 by DVK
8
votes
3answers
Is there any data to support or refute the hypothesis that sailing ships of the line were only complemented with enough gunnery crews to simultaneously fire 1 broadside but not 2? If it matters for p …
asked Nov 22 '11 by DVK