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Political history is the history of: political events, politicians, political bodies, political movements and anything else related to politics. Questions on topic will be related to the significance, evolution, or veracity of things of historical consequence related to politics.

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Generally, its only called "treason" when the damage isn't mortal. Of course when it isn't mortal, The State has a whole lot more power to go after you than you have to stay out of its power. This is …
answered Jun 13 '12 by T.E.D.
7
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The basic issue is that a central part of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement that ended the seemingly endemic ethno-religious-political violence in Northern Ireland was that both Northern Ireland and Irel …
answered Oct 12 '18 by T.E.D.
7
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Here's what the constitution has to say about Presidents and citizenship: No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitu …
answered Jun 19 by T.E.D.
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The question sort of implies that voting is a concept so complex that it was invented once, and everyone else borrowed the concept from a predecessor. In fact, tribal societies the world over have l …
answered Oct 3 '14 by T.E.D.
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That blog post is presenting the argument of Albion's Seed. However, he's presenting it in a somewhat twisted way. It looks like he's trying to make political points as much as he is historical ones, …
answered Oct 13 '14 by T.E.D.
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The prototypical example I was thinking of when I wrote this was the Weimar Republic. (Decidedly not a developing country, but a very well-studied example of the principle). They got kind of a double- …
answered Aug 13 '12 by T.E.D.
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India prior to independence in 1947 is often considered "feudal" Use of the term feudalism to describe India applies a concept of medieval European origin, according to which the landed nobility …
answered Mar 20 '18 by T.E.D.
33
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It looks fairly likely this story was invented around the turn of the 21'st Century. The hits against it are: No reference to it has ever been found any older than 1998 (reportedly from a American …
answered Aug 30 '13 by T.E.D.
3
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Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations: 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war …
answered Sep 15 '15 by T.E.D.
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For the most part yes, as their fundamental issue in both cases was support for segregation and white supremecy. They were a bit different in theory, in that the AIP was founded as a conservative (fa …
answered Jul 9 '15 by T.E.D.
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Looking at what happened, it does not appear that international issues were the primary driver. When the Constitution was first being debated and voted on, there was a group of Anti-Federalists who …
answered Mar 16 '17 by T.E.D.
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Inherent in your question it seems to me is the thesis that all Empires fall for pretty much the same reasons. I don't think that's right at all. Empires by their very nature are exceptional things, a …
answered May 24 '12 by T.E.D.
20
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There's a good chance he thought he did. There's actually an 18.5 minute gap in the tapes, about 3 days after the Watergate break-in. Of course that could have contained anything, including unrelate …
answered Jul 23 '15 by T.E.D.
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It wasn't that they were against private property because they thought it was sinful, but rather that they thought it was sinful because they were against it*. To understand this, its probably best t …
answered Mar 31 '16 by T.E.D.
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USA political campaigns are pretty much continuous these days. Many people blame this on the rise of partisan mass media outlets. I will argue they are quite correct to do so. However, if you look ba …
answered Oct 5 '12 by T.E.D.

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