44

It sounds like you are talking about the transition from Romanesque/Gothic painting styles to Renaissance styles. This is a big topic in Art History (or at least was when I took it back in the '80's). A lot of this may just come back to issues of style, which of course exist because they exist. However, there were some practical differences between the two. ...


28

Anything other than photo-realism makes you 'angry and confused'? That's sad. You're missing out on enjoying a whole lot of good stuff! Early pictorial art was often allegorical rather than strictly representational. Items were sized and placed to show their relationships and relative importance. Or just placed. Want a boat? Want an elephant? OK, here'...


25

19th CENTURY HISTORIANS The term Hundred Years' War originated in the early 19th century. The Hundred Years War has become the established name for the Anglo-French conflicts that happened between 1337 and 1453. Although the designation does not refer to an actual event—the term was first used in France in the early 19th century — it usefully ...


23

There's been some perspective around for a long time. Look at this ceiling, from "The Vergilius Vaticanus" dated around 400 C.E. And here's a Chinese painting from around 1000 CE showing a pretty good oblique projection: And this detail from the gigantic "Along the River During the Qingming Festival" 1085 C.E. And in "Presentation ...


23

The claim is sourced from 明興野記, lit. Unofficial Records of the Rise of Ming, by the contemporary Yu Ben. It was originally titled 紀事錄, lit. Chronicles, but a certain Zhang Da Tong later changed it because it wasn't fancy enough. Zhang also inserted some editorialising, especially to defend the emperor, as well as an abstract introducing Yu's work as "...


10

The Medieval ages, and in turn the 100 years war, was a politically a different beast than war as we are used to it in the modern era. During both world wars we see a declaration by majors powers declaring that a state of war now exists between countries and their belligerent allies. This is how the world at large waged war and is the common way that we ...


10

Jakob Twinger von Königshofen, a German chronicler alive during the 14th century, documents the, possibly forced, confessions of several Jews, amongst which is Balavignus, in his book "Chronik” (English translation available in “The Black Death in the Fourteenth Century” p. 181). Also, letters exchanged between cities, concerning the suspicion of the Jews ...


6

The answer to both questions is yes. To quote specific examples, the French won major battles after "bad", or rainy, weather at the Battle of Saint-Omer and the Battle of Cocherel. The English won the Battle of Auberoche against the numerical odds (5:1 in that case) in good weather. However, the dataset is probably too small to draw any conclusions as to ...


5

The following quotes, from English Medieval Knight 1400-1500 By Christopher Gravett on Google Books, states that retained Men-At-Arms would have worn their lords colours. Great lords employed knights and men-at-arms in private retinues, indeed sometimes so many that they formed private armies. Under this system of ‘livery and maintenance’, the retainers ...


5

Rani Padmavati is a very popular character, but to call her a historical character will be misleading, and wrong, based on evidences so far. History is based on written sources. Now, there can be a paucity of sources. Some later discovery of a written source can possibly overturn earlier versions. But written source is a must. The only two written sources ...


4

Englishmen, as well as their Gascon allies wore the red St George's cross stitched over; front and back so as to distinguish each other. Anyone found 'posing' with one who wasn't one of them scored a death sentence. It was an ordinance given by Richard II that every member of the army, lord and archer must wear it over their armour/clothing. Sources: ...


4

Ordinary soldiers did not wear emblems or colors. Units had pennants or flags. Knights might have an emblem, but that would normally be the house of the knight, not anyone else. Here is a picture illustrating a battle from the 100 Years War. As you can see they use flags and pennants:


4

Armor Essentials The essentials of the transition from twelfth-century mail harness to the fully developed plate armor of the fifteenth century man-at-arms can be summarized as follows: Articulations: Iron plate or hardened leather defenses for the elbows, knees, and shins first appeared in the mid-thirteenth century, and during the following hundred and ...


3

Not all "really old" art has no perspective. True, it's not usually seen, but good examples of it show up wherever there's a culture that was rich enough to have full-time, professional artists, and that valued realism in art. Most answer ups to now with examples of correct(ish) use of perspective in art are max from about 1000 CE, and the Roman ...


3

The Logicmuseum site lists Summa Logica: Bruges, Bibl. de la Ville 498 (an. 1340); Avignon, Bibl. Mun. 1086 (1343) meaning there is (or was) a manuscript in the Bruges municipal library (MS 498) from the year 1340, and one in the Avignon municipal library (MS 1086) from 1343.


3

Chainmaille development and construction was surprisingly consistent from the 1st century CE onwards. You are correct in your assumption that almost all extant maille finds are riveted, but there are examples that show butted maille where the wire is simply closed together. In terms of construction, there are 4 types: riveted, welded, stamped, or butted. ...


2

Referring to the Black Book of Edward IV - it's drawn from his own household accounts, so the limits to the retainers allowed are the limits Edward himself set. Remember that Edward had only managed to get, hold, then regain the throne by force-of-arms but he was very well aware that the nobles had their own retainers and that it was possible to lose the ...


1

The body of the question seems to be very different from the headline. You do not seem to be raising any substantive doubts about any particular historical account. The article you link to about the Almarician's states that 10 people were burned at the stake in Paris c. 1210. I see no specific reason to doubt that this occurred. The Wikipedia article "Death ...


1

Alberto Yagos helpfully observed in a comment that Romani entered today's Spain in 1425. A map from 1360 is as close as I could easily find, but the Emirate of Granada is far south of the Pyrenean route over which the immigrants reached "Spain". Is there evidence that any Romani people were present in the Emirate? I searched unsuccessfully in the Biblioteca ...


1

As you enter the basilica, walk down the far right side (south side). Just before you get to the steps going up to the altar area, turn to your right, through the low wrought iron "fence" (now you're facing south; you'll see tombs of Charles Martel, Clovis, etc. on your right just as you enter this chapel area). Charles V and Jeanne are in a grouping near ...


1

Actually, some of his bones were recovered and brought back to the basilique Saint-Denis, his heart is in the cathedral of Rouen and his bowels and guts in le Louvres, within his recumbent statues. https://www.tombes-sepultures.com/crbst_378.html


1

The Karaim and Tatar communities in the vicinity of Trakai date from the time of Vytautas. The Karaim spoke a similar language to the Tatars, but they weren’t Muslims, instead they professed a heterodox version of Judaism. These people may have worked as castle guards, and they seem to have regarded Vytautas as their patron and protector. There are a ...


1

Men at arms varied a lot in wealth and status. My knowledge is based on England and the hundred years war area, but you should find many universal similarities. In the early 1300s about 20-30% were knights, though by the early 1400s this was down to around 10%. Knights received 2 shillings a day as pay while common men at arms got half. You might add that ...


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