44 votes

Why did really old paintings use such bizarre, unnatural perspective/proportions?

It sounds like you are talking about the transition from Romanesque/Gothic painting styles to Renaissance styles. This is a big topic in Art History (or at least was when I took it back in the '80's). ...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
  • 119k
28 votes

Why did really old paintings use such bizarre, unnatural perspective/proportions?

Anything other than photo-realism makes you 'angry and confused'? That's sad. You're missing out on enjoying a whole lot of good stuff! Early pictorial art was often allegorical rather than strictly ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 525
25 votes
Accepted

What was the Hundred Years' War called at the time?

19th CENTURY HISTORIANS The term Hundred Years' War originated in the early 19th century. The Hundred Years War has become the established name for the Anglo-French conflicts that happened ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
23 votes

Why did really old paintings use such bizarre, unnatural perspective/proportions?

There's been some perspective around for a long time. Look at this ceiling, from "The Vergilius Vaticanus" dated around 400 C.E. And here's a Chinese painting from around 1000 CE showing a ...
mjt's user avatar
  • 331
11 votes
Accepted

Who was Balavignus?

Jakob Twinger von Königshofen, a German chronicler alive during the 14th century, documents the, possibly forced, confessions of several Jews, amongst which is Balavignus, in his book "Chronik” (...
sowa's user avatar
  • 311
10 votes

What was the Hundred Years' War called at the time?

The Medieval ages, and in turn the 100 years war, was a politically a different beast than war as we are used to it in the modern era. During both world wars we see a declaration by majors powers ...
Gavin Gnaster's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

What is the evidence supporting the story of Padmavati saving her honour by self-immolation?

Rani Padmavati is a very popular character, but to call her a historical character will be misleading, and wrong, based on evidences so far. History is based on written sources. Now, there can be a ...
Keen Pine's user avatar
  • 124
6 votes
Accepted

Did the fortunes in the Hundred Years' War depend largely on the weather?

The answer to both questions is yes. To quote specific examples, the French won major battles after "bad", or rainy, weather at the Battle of Saint-Omer and the Battle of Cocherel. The English won the ...
sempaiscuba's user avatar
  • 77.5k
3 votes

Why did really old paintings use such bizarre, unnatural perspective/proportions?

Not all "really old" art has no perspective. True, it's not usually seen, but good examples of it show up wherever there's a culture that was rich enough to have full-time, professional ...
user23514's user avatar
3 votes

The manuscript Summa Logicae (William of Ockham)

The Logicmuseum site lists Summa Logica: Bruges, Bibl. de la Ville 498 (an. 1340); Avignon, Bibl. Mun. 1086 (1343) meaning there is (or was) a manuscript in the Bruges municipal library (MS 498) ...
kimchi lover's user avatar
  • 5,874
1 vote

Which English king voided noble land claims after a certain date?

I think the recollection here is about the writ of quo warranto, a legal procedure for establishing somebody's claim to have a certain legal right. For its purposes, the cutoff point was 1189. It is ...
ell1s's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

Were people really as haphazardly *burned at the stake* back in the day in Europe as they make it out to have been?

The body of the question seems to be very different from the headline. You do not seem to be raising any substantive doubts about any particular historical account. The article you link to about the ...
Brian Z's user avatar
  • 19.6k
1 vote

Perceptions and relationships of 14-15th century Spaniards / Romani / Moors

Alberto Yagos helpfully observed in a comment that Romani entered today's Spain in 1425. A map from 1360 is as close as I could easily find, but the Emirate of Granada is far south of the Pyrenean ...
Aaron Brick's user avatar
  • 27.6k
1 vote

Tomb for Charles V (of france) and Jeanne de Bourbon in Saint Denis?

As you enter the basilica, walk down the far right side (south side). Just before you get to the steps going up to the altar area, turn to your right, through the low wrought iron "fence" (now you're ...
Barbara's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

Tomb for Charles V (of france) and Jeanne de Bourbon in Saint Denis?

Actually, some of his bones were recovered and brought back to the basilique Saint-Denis, his heart is in the cathedral of Rouen and his bowels and guts in le Louvres, within his recumbent statues. ...
Lecid's user avatar
  • 33

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