48

No. At least, not to any practical intent or purpose. Japanese in Britain Significant numbers of Japanese were actually sold into slavery overseas during the 16th century, mostly through Portuguese merchants. Aside from chattel slavery, Portuguese sailors also bought young Japanese women as concubines, and it would not have been unthinkable if one ...


14

1: Could there have been young Japanese women in Great Britain in the mid-1600s? This seems extraordinarily unlikely. According to the British Chamber of Commerce in Japan 1600 William Adams, a seaman from Kent, becomes the first Briton to arrive in Japan. 1832 Three sailors from Aichi Prefecture—Otokichi, Kyukichi and Iwakichi—cross the Pacific Ocean from ...


12

The hand gesture showing the middle fingers together has been variously described as a ‘W’ or ‘pseudo-zygodactylous gesture’ or the ‘El Greco gesture’. It seems to have originated in late renaissance or Mannerism period from 1520 to the late 17th century, and was subsequently adopted by many artists in later periods. El Greco was not the first to use this ...


8

The Dutch lost control of the seas in spite of, not because of, their "juridical" strengths. They had a different, more enlightened view of the "Law of the Sea", which they were ultimately unable to "enforce" against stronger countries. Specifically, Dutch philosophers such as Grotius, called for "open" seas for all countries, and thereby equal (commercial) ...


5

I'm inclined to write an answer with a different tone to that of the other one: namely, the Dutch never had control of the seas and as such they couldn't lose it. The strategic options that a naval power has include the control of the seas, denying the seas to the enemy, or, in essence, fighting on an equal footing (i.e., not using overpowering numbers to ...


5

In 1689 Solomon Ayllon was appointed rabbi of the Spanish and Portuguese Jews in London, and as you can see in the picture on Wikipedia, he wore a beard. (His predecessor, Jacob Abendana, who was appointed in 1680, probably did too - most religious Jews, or at least rabbis, at that time did - but I don't know of any picture of him.)


5

wip The apparently oldest drawing showing the surrounding — one Mercator drawing shows just the monument — is Ortelius Vivianus 1584: We then get another take on it in Braun & Hogenberg: "Civitates orbis terrarum, III.", 1588: (version from 1596) Then the Blaeu in question in „theatrum urbium Belgicae“ shows us this in 1649: (click for large)...


5

Olivier Bernier's biography 'Louis XIV' says, based on Mme de Motteville's account (II, 286): "Having seen the Queen in her bed, we went off home ... As soon as we had left, the gates of the Palais Royal were closed with the command to not open them again. The Queen got up again to think about her situation and confided her secret only to her First ...


4

Some aspects of the below were specific to Sweden while others common to most belligerents in the war. Where possible, I used Swedish examples as that was the OP's topic of interest. Changes during the Thirty Years War The long period of warfare seems to have been the cause for changes in how prisoners were dealt with. This is a general overview which ...


4

We all know the impossiblity of proving a negative, but I'm going to go out on a limb and claim that there was no such ruin, and that the artist added it for symmetry or effect. Why? First, while there has been plenty written about the Säule and the Kirche, what I have read about the town of Igel did not reveal any other historic tower having been there. ...


2

Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, built a retreat called Sans Souci that many consider a miniature "Versailles." It was built at Potsdam, which is to say twenty miles or so away from Berlin, as Versailles was from Paris, to allow the king refuge from the capital. The estate featured a large park, fountains, and numerous temples for the king's strolling ...


2

Probably not. Michael Romanov accepted the throne reluctantly (at age 16), and mainly out of a sense of duty to family members who had been abused by the previous Tsar, Boris Gudunov. The Third Rome issue was much more in vogue around the turn of the 15th and 16th centuries. This was used to support the claim to the Russian throne of Ivan III, who had ...


2

Very unlikely. The Russian orthodox Church became autocephalous in 1448, half a decade before Constantinople fell (though such was clearly imminent). Throughout the Middle Ages the true heir of the Roman Empire was seen to be the various Christian Catholic Patriarchies, of Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. It was as natural for the ...


2

Short Answer. I can't say whether any of the votes for Michael Romanov had anything to do with his "Roman" surname. Long Answer: I do have some comments on the Third Rome ideologies of Russia and other states. And I have a suggestion for how the Romanov family could have claimed to be descended from Roman Emperors, though as far as I know the Romanovs ...


1

Short Answer: That story is not impossible in the sense of violating laws of physics, but extremely improbable, especially as some of the characters may have violated the laws of one or more nations and risked severe punishment by doing so. Long Answer: in the 17th century (1601-1700) a number of English persons were slave owners, of a sort. They were ...


1

After a fashion, yes. The {Brazilian gold rush began at the end of the 17th century in the mountainous province of Minas Gerais (General Mines in English), a rich ore-producing region to this day. Perhaps a million people, close to half of the population of Brazil "went south" (Brazil's "west") from the Atlantic coast in the northeastern part of the country....


1

Denis' answer is helpful as an overview of European weaponry in the period, but a more complete answer would need to look more directly to historical records of the early Dutch expeditions to Australia. I'm not finding much but here are a few hints. Quoting from a web page about Janszoon's voyage: In 1603, Willem Janszoon was given command of his first ...


1

From "Jesuit Misionaries in N America, by François Rustang". There are not many comments about clothing. The Jesuits appear much more worried about dying from hunger in the winter, and about being captured/enslaved/tortured/killed by the Iroquois. a letter from Paul le Jeune, on his first wintering among the natives: In the beggining I had used one of ...


1

As a child in Ontario, I went on a field trip to Sainte Marie Among the Hurons, a sort of pioneer village that depicts life in that time and place. While it's closed now because of winter, the May 9th opening is currently on hold because of Covid. Their web site includes a number of pictures showing people in costume. I poked around on several pages and saw ...


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