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Some aspects of the below were specific to Sweden while others common to most belligerents in the war. Where possible, I used Swedish examples as that was the OP's topic of interest. Changes during the Thirty Years War The long period of warfare seems to have been the cause for changes in how prisoners were dealt with. This is a general overview which ...


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After a fashion, yes. The {Brazilian gold rush began at the end of the 17th century in the mountainous province of Minas Gerais (General Mines in English), a rich ore-producing region to this day. Perhaps a million people, close to half of the population of Brazil "went south" (Brazil's "west") from the Atlantic coast in the northeastern part of the country....


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Olivier Bernier's biography 'Louis XIV' says, based on Mme de Motteville's account (II, 286): "Having seen the Queen in her bed, we went off home ... As soon as we had left, the gates of the Palais Royal were closed with the command to not open them again. The Queen got up again to think about her situation and confided her secret only to her First ...


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Short Answer: That story is not impossible in the sense of violating laws of physics, but extremely improbable, especially as some of the characters may have violated the laws of one or more nations and risked severe punishment by doing so. Long Answer: in the 17th century (1601-1700) a number of English persons were slave owners, of a sort. They were ...


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Question: Was it possible for a young Japanese woman to end up enslaved in Great Britain in the mid-1600s? Possible? I would say yes. While it's true Japan's official slave system from the Yamato period (3rd century A.D.) through the Toyotomi Hideyoshi was abolished in 1590; the Western definition for slavery is perhaps broader in nature than that which ...


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No. At least, not to any practical intent or purpose. Japanese in Britain Significant numbers of Japanese were actually sold into slavery overseas during the 16th century, mostly through Portuguese merchants. Aside from chattel slavery, Portuguese sailors also bought young Japanese women as concubines, and it would not have been unthinkable if one ...


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1: Could there have been young Japanese women in Great Britain in the mid-1600s? This seems extraordinarily unlikely. According to the British Chamber of Commerce in Japan 1600 William Adams, a seaman from Kent, becomes the first Briton to arrive in Japan. 1832 Three sailors from Aichi Prefecture—Otokichi, Kyukichi and Iwakichi—cross the Pacific ...


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The navy of the Dutch Republic became the first navy to build the larger ocean-going frigates. But these were considerably larger than sailing ships of the time. The SPanish and British used smaller frigates (6th rate ship) with 40 guns and 300 tons. With 20 guns on each side, you're talking 20 men to fire, the sailing crew so look at about 160-250 men. ...


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The Dutch lost control of the seas in spite of, not because of, their "juridical" strengths. They had a different, more enlightened view of the "Law of the Sea", which they were ultimately unable to "enforce" against stronger countries. Specifically, Dutch philosophers such as Grotius, called for "open" seas for all countries, and thereby equal (commercial) ...


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