Hot answers tagged

64

In old cars you had to turn the wheel a lot further, because there was no power steering. For a feel of that, push a car when the engine is dead and try to steer it without engine assistance (it's hard!). Also the actors would have to act driving with no idea what the screen behind them was doing, and often still do.


59

Yes. There are many articles supporting this claim. Here's one from Bloomberg: For four decades, the U.S. Department of Energy tested more than a thousand nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site, a desert expanse just 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The 1951 detonation of a warhead 1,060 feet over the desert floor marked the beginning of the above-ground ...


46

In addition to the points that Maury Markowitz described, another factor was the large amount of free play in many car steering systems of that era. I was a young kid in the late 1950s, and I distinctly remember getting to sit in the driver's seat of various family cars (while parked, of course) and "drive" them with my hands on the steering wheel. Unlike a ...


37

In regards the secondary question, namely Am I missing something here? Yes; absolutely. You have neglected both the shielding effect of the 65 miles of air between Las Vegas and the bomb explosions, and the fact that the actual radiation intensity falls off as the square of the distance. The study The Children of Atomic Bomb Survivors: A Genetic Study. by ...


18

turning the wheel wildly to the left and right For the very simple reason that they could not see the images. So you get them to make random motions, because steering straight while the scenery is moving about is even weirder, your brain is telling you the car is not moving because they're not doing anything. In the 1950s the typical technique was to put ...


9

For another account on the (this time informed) contemporary attitude, read Richard Feynman's book Los Alamos from Below published here in full or quoted here. The gist is, he figured that at 20 miles distance he would be safe behind a car's windshield and would see more without dark glasses. ... But just a few minutes before it was supposed to go off the ...


8

I'd say, from the partial emblem on the front, that the aircraft was part of the USAF 322d Airlift Division (Combat Cargo) in 1962-3. According to this article the "[322 Air Division] sent a squadron of C-130 Hercules to India just after the end of the 1962 hostilities with China". To give credit where it's due, @TomMcW & @Gerry on the Aviation board ...


8

Yes. Earlier editions were run for home delivery (often arriving at homes around 5AM) and later editions for newsstands. For East Coast papers, there would be major differences between the two in coverage of evening sports events (especially games played in California). I was especially aware of this growing up in the suburbs and attending high school in ...


7

Other answers are correct when mentioning the absence of power steering at the time and the fact that the actor/actress ‘driving’ could not see the screen behind them, but budget and time constraints were also an important factor as was, in some cases at least, cinematic technique. Note also that exaggerated physical movement by actors could make up for a ...


6

The many cues to observe: Picture quality Although it might be even higher resolution and a better scan: depth of field, focus, shadows etc point to an overall technology that's more late than sooner. The vehicles RBarryYoung: Ok, I am now pretty sure that the bus is a Flxible Clipper and not a Visicoach from the Flxible owners site. The last year they ...


5

I think that this is quite a pertinent and interesting question. Depending on one's location, Americans may seem to have a 'natural' predisposition towards cars and using them. However, this obviously reflects something in how that country developed and what choices it made. In short, the re-alignment of the post-war economy with the war-time repressed ...


5

According to "Military Classifications for Draftees" compiled by the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, the following situations could get you out of military service during the Korean War: 1. physically, mentally, or morally unfit 2. essential civilian employment 3. essential agricultural employment 4 having dependents including wife and children 5. ...


5

The earliest use of Golden Age with reference to musical theatre in general which I've been able to find is in this May 3rd 1977 New York Times review by Clive Barnes of a revival of The King and I with Yul Brynner. The title is of the review is: 'King and I,’ Reminder of Golden Age The review goes on to call The King and I a reminder of what the Broadway ...


5

Two short answers: 1) By today's standards, "not a lot." 2) By the standards of the preceding decades, "a lot." That's because the 1950s represented the "dawn" of today's drug culture. "Conservative 1950s" describes only the adult culture of the time. That's because the adults had lived through the deprivations of the the Great Depression, and the ...


4

Perhaps you are not familiar with the US West? Even today (and more so in the 1940s & 50s) there are places where you can be miles and miles (substitute km if desired) away from anything much other than sagebrush and rattlesnakes. The tests were conducted in such locations. (Note that Las Vegas wasn't much of a place in those days, either.) OTOH, ...


3

Well, drugs and drug abuse has been around since the beginning of man, of that I am positive. In the Victorian era, for instance, addiction to laudanum was a major thing. Mary Todd Lincoln (the First Lady) was said to have been so addicted. As far as the American 50's, according to a blog I read the wide-spread drug abuse of the 60's was the direct result ...


3

I just wanted to add this link to what has been said. Yes, the mindset was that radiation from the bombs was not as dangerous. If you want proof of there, here is a youtube video of five army guys STANDING AT GROUND ZERO during an air burst. (The missile explodes several miles directly above them) In fact, the army did drills where troops would hunker down ...


3

Those are typically worn to designate mourning in Western culture. However, its very rare to see them on anyone other than a man who has just or is just about to attend a funeral, usually as one of the pallbearers. Additionally, its only worn if the person in question doesn't have an appropriately black or dark suit coat (or dress) to wear, which is ...


2

There's an important social aspect to this that hasn't been addressed so far. Until August 1949, when the USSR performed its first nuclear test, the atom bomb was the source and symbol of the USA's status as the sole superpower. After that, the improvement of atom bombs and development of hydrogen bombs was an important part of American actions to maintain ...


2

The first guess might of course be that a newspaper announced to stop circulation, perhaps only of its 'morning edition', or the entire outfit is about to close down. Thus final edition, ever. Like: The Evening Sun publishes its final editions today,… A more likely explanation however is that compared to a bulldog edition, the final edition of a daily ...


2

Since this touches on something that affects all countries, I'm going to answer it with statistics from another country: Reported Road Casualties UK. You can see that last year, 1800 people died in traffic accidents in the UK last year. The number has been falling steadily since 1980. Before then in the years provided, the number was never lower than 4000, ...


2

America has historically been a young people oriented society that celebrated a youth culture. This youth culture has taken different turns at various times, depending on its intersection with whatever else was going on in American society at the time. The book "Generations, by William Strauss and Neil Howe explains that the teenagers of the 1950s and ...


2

It was taken about 1970, if you believe The Pram Museum, since the baby stroller in the right foreground is a Columbia Tuk-A-Way (USA manufacturer). Although, here's an ad for the same stroller reportedly offered in 1954. From the auto in the photo, that seems likley.


1

I have not read this, but heard it from someone who was in the US Army at the time. The easiest way to avoid the draft was to claim to be homosexual. I suppose this is what is meant by "morally unfit" in point (1) of Barry's answer.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible