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1

According to LeCount & Strong's San Francisco City Directory for the Year 1854, the U.S. Land Commission met in John Parrott's "Iron Building" at 148 California Street. According to Igler's Industrial Cowboys (2001): ... the four floors of his Iron Building conveniently housed the clerks, archives, and officers of the U.S. Board of Land Claims ...


2

No, no bayonets. They wouldn't have had a spot to put them, as they had a special uniform type for off-duty, the 'walking-out' uniform. The primary difference with this uniform was the fact that it had a plain white belt -no weapon sheaths. From the Victorian Uniform Guide for one particular unit(all emphasis mine): Walking Out Belt - A P71 buff leather ...


3

The accepted answer is unfortunately wrong. Why wrong? Emperors are/have been himself/herself the embodiment of Japanese culture so that abandoning the national language would be equal with the blaspheme to and the total relinquishment of Japanese culture, westernizing everywhere, demolishing old shrines and other historical statues and constructions, ...


3

With some caveats: I'd argue that it's not any type of 'court dress' that's difficult to analyse. Highest fashion – whether 'court' or not – is in reality much more convoluted than idealised typical types. But this is a real-world example, unlike idealised 'type' examples in fashion books. As such, for example her arm dressings (the slit/paned sleeves) are ...


3

Court wear is intrinsically weird. The dags on the bodice (waist) are characteristic of court dress, not normal clothes. "Garniture" is not a familiar term. Bodice would be a single piece. White skirt is second piece. Bustle & en train are a third piece. (Consulting with my professional historian girlfriend, who is also a Costume Society of America ...


4

Among the many thousands who joined the gold rush and dug with their own hands, a few struck it rich but couldn't be called 'exceedingly wealthy'. Many more gathered a decent sum before (wisely) packing it in and setting off back home. The large majority, of course, found little or else squandered their gains. One non-supplier who did become very wealthy ...


4

Some did well at the mines; the matter of whether they stayed wealthy is quite another. According to Antonio Coronel's memoir, Tales of Mexican California, (pp. 54-55), Lorenzo Soto took out 52 lbs of gold in 8 days.


4

Of course the miners did not get rich. Miners never get rich. Mine Owners, who hire miners to do the work, are the ones who get rich from mining. Prospectors can get a relatively large chunk of money when they make a successful find and those are the stories that spread like wildfire and entice so many people to join the rush. Stories like William ...


2

The library of the Jesuit college of Durango had 2,555 books, worth 3,345 pesos, when it was taken over by the local diocese in 1767. At the end of the century the library had grown to around 3,830 volumes. The mileage (a unit of measure already established in other answers) between Durango and Sitka is 2746. The holdings statistics come up in the article "...


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