62

To sum it up: The costs simply outweighed the benefits. You have to consider that Germania at this time was essentially one huge forest, which was very, well empty. No cities to conquer, the first German cities were actually founded by the Romans, like e.g. Aachen, Cologne or Trier. The Germans were primitive tribesmen and had little to offer to the Roman ...


25

First, Jesus did not live in Judea, but in the more rural and distant province of Galilee. The major population center was Sepphoris, Herod Antipas' seat of power. Historians generally agree that Jesus would have plied his trade in that city: Sepphoris... was moneyed. It was the center of trade for the area. And if Jesus were growing up in Nazareth, ...


20

The Romans were able to "conquer" large parts of Germania, briefly. They were unable to HOLD it for any length of time. The reason stemmed from the region's "backwardness." There was no central government or central power through which the Romans could operate. There were no cities (except the ones the Romans built). There were few roads, and the country ...


13

The alternative theory is put forward by Suetonius (Nero, 38-39) who strongly supports the idea that the fire was Nero's doing, and that common people saw his agents with torches but didn't dare stop or detain them. 'Nero fiddled while Rome burned' is a reference to Suetonius's account of Nero singing a poem (probably of his own composition) about the fall ...


13

There is an ample evidence (from authors like Plutarch, Cicero etc.) that the only occupations which were considered appropriate for the Romans from good families were military, politics, administration, law and literature. (To be sure many of them were involved in business but they did not like to advertise this). Doctors, engineers, artists (including ...


10

Yes and no. This is one of the questions addressed in Zealot, The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, by Reza Aslan. From what I can see of the reviews, it does a good job (for an "accessible" popular book) of representing the current state of scholarly historical research on the historical Jesus. According to Aslan, there were the following people ...


8

It depends precisely what is meant by "co-regency". I will try to outline the widely accepted facts. According to historian Beth Severy, Augustus announced his intention in 4 CE that Tiberius should inherent his title as emperor. Augustus adopted Tiberius as a son and give him a triumph and "a special grant of imperium". Over the following decade: For ...


7

Visitors from other lands You have listed the most common languages spoken in Jerusalem already -- Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, and even some Latin -- but the passage in Acts that you refer to answers your question: there were Jews living all over the place in the ancient world, even before the diaspora after the two wars with the Romans in the first century (...


5

Why Caesar crossed the Rubicon is a question none other than Caesar himself answered: 'They wanted it so. I, Gaius Caesar, in spite of such great deeds would have been condemned, had I not sought help from my army (hoc uoluerunt. tantis rebus gestis C. Caesar condemnatus essem nisi ab exercitu auxilium petissem).' (Suet. Dl 30.4; Plut. Caes. 46.1. ) ...


4

According to Wikipedia, after the death of King Herod Agrippa in 44CE Galilee and Peraea were incorporated into the province of Iudaea. Over the next century there were no less than 3 major Jewish revolts. The last one was such a serious blow to Roman prestige that when Emperor Hadrian finally suppressed it, he decided the best way to prevent any further ...


4

To answer only part of the question: The wealth of first century carpenters is impossible to compare to highly paid workers in late capitalism. Wealth has a fundamentally different meaning in our society to that of Antiquity; and, as such, a valid comparison is impossible. It is however possible to explain wealth and poverty from the first century in ways ...


3

Here is a time line of events of the civil war between Caesar and Pompey (continued by his party after his death) 50 - Caesar enters Italy proper by crossing the Rubicon with his army 49 - Pompey evacuates Italy and arrives in Greece On route to Spain, Caesar initiates a siege of Massilia, he leaves for Spain, and his subordinates successfully end the ...


2

In the book The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City.' (Da Capo, Cambridge, Mass, 7 September 2010). author Stephen Dando Collins puts forward the theory that the people persecuted by Nero were not Christians, but an Egyptian sect (the priests of Isis). Part of the reasoning is that Christians were few at the time and relatively ...


1

Apparently this was quite common. As stated in the comments the New testament mentions John the Baptist and possibly others. There is also some primary sources describing the situation: I mean the dead Sea Scrolls (a. k. a. Qumran scrolls) which describe a religious community and a leader with some similarity to Jesus. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/...


1

Question: Why was Caesar at the Rubicon? Short Answer: The perception was Caesar was at the Rubicon, with a single legion (1/10th of his available forces) to seek terms in his confrontation with his political rivals who controlled the Senate. That Caesar subsequently crossed the Rubicon, invading Rome reluctantly only after his moderate requirements for ...


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