19

Yes, this is historically accurate. Writing on bamboo slips was not entirely abandoned until the 4th century CE---over a century after the Romance of the Three Kingdoms takes place. As the Wikipedia article on the history of paper that you linked to states, the primary use of ancient Chinese paper before this was for wrapping things, not writing. One of the ...


16

I’m thinking I should rephrase my comment above as an answer. I believe the correct answer would be “they didn’t”, and that’s why. While the surname and name of Cao Cao almost match in modern Mandarin (except the tone is different, Cáo Cāo, so they don’t), the similarity is but a figment produced by the language development that led to modern Mandarin. He ...


12

It is known that coins were minted in the first years, if not the first, of the new Emperor's reign. The populace often learned of a new Roman Emperor when coins appeared with the new Emperor's portrait. Some of the emperors who ruled only for a short time made sure that a coin bore their image; Quietus, for example, ruled only part of the Roman Empire from ...


11

What animals: Oxen The scheme: Paddle-Wheel Used for warfare: Unlikely ~ (No evidence exists) The first mention of paddle wheels as a means of propulsion comes from the 4th–5th century military treatise De Rebus Bellicis (chapter XVII) you described, where the anonymous Roman author describes an ox-driven paddle-wheel warship: "Animal power, directed ...


7

The short answer is, the historical list (i.e. the image in the question) provided with the year-stamp is not really showing the chronology properly. The key point is Chen Shou's Records of the Three Kingdoms, although written in the 3rd century, should be correctly stated as "annotated & compiled in the 5th century" (by Pei Songzhi). So, it should show: ...


6

The Roman Empire had extended beyond the Euphrates since the second century CE. The Roman province of Mesopotamia had been established by the Emperor Septimius Severus in c 198 CE. (Technically, one might argue that the province was re-established by Septimius Severus, since an earlier province had been established by Trajan, before being given up by his ...


5

I highly doubt it. Bar one line, that almost-exact quote The greatest traitor has always resembled an honest man and the greatest falsehood comes across as truth. Righteousness and evil cannot be discerned by their appearance. People have decided wrongly about me in the past. Today they still misjudge me, and may continue to do so in the future. However, I ...


5

Several points to be made here: As the other answer mentioned, the names are far from identical. Linguists would probably categorise the language spoken at Cáo Cāo's time as Eastern Han Chinese. The Old Chinese reconstruction (Baxter-Sagart, 2014) would be /*N-tsˤu [tsʰ]ˤawʔ/. As given in the Records of the Three Kingdoms, the only description of his name ...


5

Wiki says that Zhang Miao betrayed Cao Cao, so Cao Cao killed his whole family for revenge. Previously, though, Cao Cao's family had been killed in Xu province, and he had invaded Xu to kill the whole population. So we can argue he was doing the same thing here, taking his anger out on an entire city.


5

Kong Rong and his family's execution was not due to saying any one thing. Rather, Cao Cao long harboured a festering resentment over his vocal criticism. As a 20th generation descendant of Confucius Kong was a Han loyalist. In line with Confuscian morals, he strongly opposed Cao Cao's increasingly tyrannical usurpation of imperial governance. The Book of ...


3

Their itinary as per the Zizhi Tongjian 61 and 62: July 195: The emperor departed Chang'an via the Xuanping Gate. After being briefly stopped by Guo Si's men (who retired when the emperor told them off), they arrived at Baling that night. Later, Guo Si wanted everyone to go to Gaoling, but the ministers and Zhang Ji thought Hongnong was more appropriate. ...


1

It is entirely possible. The emperor did not travel alone: he had to travel with his eunuchs, empress, concubines, etc. Lots of women made their trip extremely slow. All of China was infested by bandits, warlords, deserters and angry farmers. The emperor might need to hide for a while or even go back and forth in order to hide from danger. As you can read ...


1

This mechanism would have had limited use in a naval vessel, because of the absence of a reversible gear drive. (The first such was invented by Filippo Bruneschelli during construction of the dome for Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence about 1420 AD.) Changing direction without one involved unharnessing all the oxen, reversing them on the platform,...


1

I don't know of any other college of leadership without any ties of family anywhere else in Roman history or any other culture. It would seem to have been Diocletian's creation, fit to the conditions of the crisis of the time, so that the other three leaders would be too busy sustaining the empire to worry about anything else. The virtually instant ...


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